• May 3 - 6, 2015

    Hilton Baltimore

    AOHC 2015

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    Pre/Post Conference Courses |  Sunday Sessions |  Monday Sessions |  Tuesday Sessions |  Wednesday Sessions  

    MONDAY SESSIONS – MAY 4
    Conference Session / Activity Time Credit Hours
    201: Becoming Board Certified and Maintaining Board Certification in Occupational Medicine 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    202: Healthy Ways to Partner with a Mentor or Recruiter During Your OEM Professional Journey 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    203: Becoming an ACOEM Fellow 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    204: Occupational Surveillance for DoD Firearms Instructors 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    205: How to Design Competency-based Educational Programs
    (Special Invitation Only)
    7:00 am - 8:00 am  1.0 CME / MOC
    206: What Employees with Obesity Want: Research-based Insights for Employers 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    207: Improving Care for Low Back Pain 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    208: NIOSH-OSHA Workplace Investigation 8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC 
    209: Commercial Driver Medical Examinations: Update and Complicated Cases - Beyond the Medical Examiner Handbook 8:30 pm - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    210: Resident Research Abstract Presentation 8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC 
    211: Scope of Practice, Quality of Care, and Injury Reporting 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    212: Occupational and Work-related Asthma Guidelines 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    801: Occupational Health at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore  1:00 pm - 5:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    213: 33 Lessons from 33 Years in Occupational Health 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    214: ACOEM TED Talks: How to Plan and Deliver Outstanding OEM Presentations 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    215: Improve Your Ability to Critically Appraise Scientific Evidence 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    216: Occupational and Environmental Cancer-risk Evaluation and Causation 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    217: Public Safety Medicine Update 2015 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    218: Using OEM Principles and Practices as the Foundation of Post-deployment Care in the VA 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    219: Practical Uses of the New ACOEM Spine Guidelines 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    220: The Independent Medical Examination 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    221: The FCE: A Demonstration with Enchancements Targeting Disability Prevention 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    222: Best Practices in EU Work Disability Management: Implications for the US 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    223: Updates on Epigenetic and Exposure Data on Pesticide and Herbicide Occupational Health Clinician 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1.0 CME / MOC 
    224: NASA Occupational Health: Don't Leave Your Planet Without It 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1.0 CME / MOC 
    225: Implication of Climate Change for Occupational Health Clinicians 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1.0 CME / MOC  

     

    201: Becoming Board Certified and Maintaining Board Certification in Occupational Medicine
    TRACK: Other

    Faculty:


    Clare Bonnema, American Board of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL
    William W. Greaves*, MD, MSPH, American Board of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL
    Ron Stout*, MD, MPH, MPH-HA, FACOEM, FACPM, FAAFP, Procter & Gamble, Mason, OH

    Members of the American Board of Preventive Medicine will be on hand to discuss specifics regarding the rules for acceptance as a candidate to sit for the initial certification examination, as well as for the four parts required for recertification under Maintenance of Certification: professionalism, lifelong learning, cognitive examination, and practice performance. Extensive Q&A with attendees has been a hallmark of this session. Additional information is available on the ABPM web site at www.theabpm.org. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. 


     

    202: Healthy Ways to Partner with a Mentor or Recruiter During Your OEM Professional Journey
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    Mark J. Bouquet*, MD, MPH, MS, The Dow Chemical Company, Plaquemine, LA
    Allison L. Jones*, MD, MS, FACOEM, Urbana, IL

    Understanding state-of-the-art methods of how to evaluate a contract for OEM work and ways to best present yourself professionally have been presented as part of Residents and Recent Graduates (RRG) section offerings at recent AOHCs. Tools related to these presentations have been created and circulated to RRG members as a benefit. This year we hope to offer an indepth panel discussion and opportunity to meet with OEM shareholders in the area of working with a career mentor and discuss how to effectively partner with various types of Recruiters as a part of your professional life be it for your first post-residency job or for further career interest changes or advancements throughout your professional life. This session was organized by the Residents and Recent Graduates Special Interest Section.


     

    203: Becoming an ACOEM Fellow
    TRACK: Other

    Faculty:

    Natalie Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA

    Fellow is the highest classification of membership in ACOEM. Fellowship distinguishes and recognizes members of the College for their training, accomplishments, and experience in occupational medicine at the national, component, and local levels, as well as the member’s academic and scientific contributions. The Committee of Fellowship Examiners feels passionately that the College needs more Fellows and that those who are making significant contributions to the College and the field of occupational and environmental medicine deserve special recognition. Come to this session to learn about the Fellowship application process.


     


    204: Occupational Surveillance for DoD Firearms Instructors
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management

    Faculty:

    Steven M. Hetrick*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, San Antonio, TX

    Several teams of military fire arms instructors have complained of developing physical effects while instructing at the Lackland outdoor firing range. Symptoms predominantly point to mucosal surface irritation, but a few instances have been reported indicating systemic illness. Worker symptoms appear to coincide with exposure to firing line smoke and gasses. Stock ammunition is composed of frangible rounds. This session will articulate worker complaints and the subsequent workplace investigation, including the industrial hygiene surveillance and medical monitoring employed.


     

    205: How to Design Competency-based Educational Programs
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research

    Faculty:

    Francesca K. Litow*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    Erik J. Won*, DO, MPH, MBA, FACOEM, Boeing, Long Beach, CA

    Attendance at this session is by invitation only.

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    206: What Employees with Obesity Want: Research-based Insights for Employers
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    Kevin McCabe*, MD, Occupational Health and Wellness, Racine, WI
    Charles P. Reynolds*, MS, The Benfield Group, St. Louis, MO
    Bruce Sherman*, MD, FCCP, FACOEM, Employers Health Coalition, Canton, OH

    This presentation will provide participants with research-based insights to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their obesity prevention and management strategies. The Benfield Group completed a survey of 600+ fully employed individuals who were obese or overweight with related co-morbidities. Using a unique methodology that enables quantification of qualitative data, the research explored life and work/career impacts of excess weight; experiences with weight-loss attempts; experiences, impacts, and preferences regarding physician support and employer-sponsored programs; and perceptions and preferences regarding weight loss medicines. Data analyses revealed distinct cluster-types, with each cluster analyzed to identify differentiating attributes. Research implications will be presented, providing insights to help attendees leverage employee communications, wellness programs and benefit design to improve their obesity prevention and management strategies.


     

    207: Improving Care for Low Back Pain
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Harris Allen, PhD, Harris Allen Group, Brookline, MA
    William Bunn*, MD, JD, MPH, FACOEM, Hilton Head Island, SC
    Michael Erdil*, MD, FACOEM, Occupational and Environmental Health Network, Marlborough, MA

    Much clinical uncertainty still exists regarding care for low back pain (LBP), the number one issue for workers compensation claims. Despite sharp increases in the use of treatments ranging from imaging to opioids to surgery, there is no clear evidence to date linking LBP to improved functional status and declining work disability. As guidelines for improving LBP care are disseminated, a key contribution that employers can make is the cultivation of evidence. The results from a recent study of the workforce at a major self-insured employer will be presented to address issues key to a successful program of illness prevention and reduction of workers’ comp, disability and health care costs (e.g., the treatment choices that employees and clinicians make; the impact of these choices on total costs; the extent to which congruence with these guidelines alters this impact). Implications for ACOEM guideline conclusions, provider recommendations, and patient education will be discussed.

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    208: NIOSH-OSHA Workplace Investigation
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM

    Faculty:

    Wendi J. Dick, MD, MSPH, MCRP, FACPM, OSHA, Office of Occupational Medicine, Washington, DC
    Judith Eisenberg, MD, MS, CDC NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Kathleen Fagan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Michael J. Hodgson*, MD, MPH, OSHA/DOL, Washington, DC
    Clifford S. Mitchell, MS, MD, MPH, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, MD
    Elena Page*, MD, MPH, NIOSH/CDC, Cincinnati, OH
    Richard J. Thomas*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OSHA, Office of Occupational Medicine, Washington, DC
    Christine West, PhD, RN, COHN-S, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH

    OSHA and NIOSH medical officers will present findings of recent workplace investigations and health hazard evaluations. The presenters will describe the cases, the approaches to the investigations, the investigation results, and the recommendations to employers. Implications for occupational medicine practice, regulations, research, worker and employer education and public health will be explored, as relevant for each case. Time for questions and discussion will be included.


     

    209: Commercial Driver Medical Examinations: Update and Complicated Cases - Beyond the Medical Examiner Handbook
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Natalie Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA
    Kurt T. Hegmann*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACOEM, University of Utah, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    Eric Wood*, MD, MPH, Rocky Mountain Center for OEH, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    The first part of this session will provide an update on the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners and other issues that affect commercial driver medical examiners, focusing on issues that have arisen since AOHC 2014. The second part of the session will discuss resources beyond the Medical Examiner Handbook an examiner might consider in evaluating challenging cases. This session was organized by the Transportation Special Interest Section.


     

    210: Resident Research Abstract Presentation
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research

    Faculty:

    John D. Meyer*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

    This session will provide residents in occupational and environmental medicine with a forum to present current and cutting-edge research in OEM. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    211: Scope of Practice, Quality of Care, and Injury Reporting
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    Pam Carter, RN, MSN, COHNS, FAAOHN, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Pensacola, FL
    Kathleen Fagan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Michael J. Hodgson*, MD, MPH, OSHA/DOL, Washington, DC
    Robyn Robbins, United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Washington, DC

    Clinical licensure represents a state-based qualification, with marked differences in scope of practice. Actual clinical practice depends on setting, quality management, training, and teamwork. We will present results for 4 states (Alabama, Florida, North Caroline, Georgia) of an assessment of practice levels and quality. We obtained scope of practice information and assessed practice patterns in one plant in and from each of four States. Various levels of licensed nurses were clearly unaware of their permitted clinical scope; physicians were unaware of appropriate collaborative and supervisory practices and responsibilities. The consequences clearly led to misclassification and under-reporting of injury.


     

    Worksite Visit 801: Occupational Health at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore
    TRACK: Other

    Faculty:

    The worksite visit to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore will start with a presentation on zoo hazards and health and safety programs for employees. This overview will cover zoonosis, envenomation, and emergency response, as well as more routine issues such as traumatic injuries. This will be followed by a tour to an animal care area with a talk by one of the animal caretakers. The visit will conclude with a tour of the animal hospital to see the similarities and differences compared to a human hospital and learn more about zoo veterinarian risks. Note – this worksite visit requires a great deal of walking and time outdoors. Please wear sturdy, closed-toe shoes and dress appropriately for the weather (i.e., jacket, umbrella, poncho). Advanced registration required, additional fee applies.

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    212: Occupational and Work-related Asthma Guidelines
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 
     

    Faculty:

    Philip Harber*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
    Julia E. Klees*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, BASF Corporation, Florham Park, NJ

    Occupational asthma has become the most common form of occupational lung disease in many industrialized countries, with approximately 10-15% of all prevalent cases of adult asthma attributed to occupational factors; work exacerbation affects 25% of asthmatics. ACOEM recently produced evidence-based guidelines for occupational/work-related asthma. This session will review the diagnosis of work-related occupational asthma, review the benefits and harms of the diagnostic tests used, identify the best practices for diagnosing asthma, and managing asthma to ensure that the patient is receiving the most effective treatment. This session will consist of lectures, interactive discussion, and case studies. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    213: 33 Lessons from 33 Years in Occupational Health
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM

    Faculty:

    Frank Leone*, MBA, MPH, RYAN Associates, Santa Barbara, CA

    This session will provide physicians with a series of 33 suggestions for better understanding the occupational health vision and their potential role in supporting this vision. All observations will be based on the speaker’s 33 years in the field, including 30 years as president/CEO of RYAN Associates and 24 years as executive director of the National Association of Occupational Health Professionals. The speaker will address a myriad of issues important to occupational medicine physicians such as product design and integration, multiple-party relationships and communication, and associating value with occupational medicine services. Changes in the discipline during the past 33 years – both constructive and destructive – wil be reviewed in the context of moving forward most effectively.


     

    214: ACOEM TED Talks: How to Plan and Deliver Outstanding OEM Presentations
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental

    Faculty:

    Marianne Cloeren*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Managed Care Advisors, Bethesda, MD
    Constantine J. Gean*, MD, MS, MBA, FACOEM, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Glendale, CA
    T. Warner Hudson*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
    Bernyce Peplowski*, DO, MS, FACOEM, US HealthWorks Medical Group, San Francisco, CA
    Kent W. Peterson*, MD, FACOEM, Occupational Health Strategies, Charlottesville, VA

    A core skills for population health management competency is communication – the ability to organize and deliver effective presentations to diverse groups of people. This session offers simple, powerful tools for every presenter to advance from a “good” to “great” to “outstanding” presenter. Outstanding presenters gain attention and inspire audiences, convey powerful messages clearly, and impact behaviors to narrow learning gaps – all leading to positive health outcomes. The new ACOEM Teaching Academy will outline its mission of inspiring teaching excellence within ACOEM and preview key skills from a new series of teaching videos being released by ACOEM. Outstanding presenters will present succinct summaries on the following topics: a) the Journey to Becoming an Excellent Presenter; b) How to Prepare an Effective Presentation; c) Creating High Impact Teaching Materials; d) Speaking Skills: How to Deliver Magic with Confidence; and e) Practical Ways to Engage Your Audience and Foster Enduring Learning. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    215: Update on Evaluation of TBI/Concussion
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research
       

    Faculty:


    Judith Green McKenzie*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACPM, FACOEM, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
    John Piacentino*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, NIOSH, Washington, DC

    Assessing and integrating new scientific information into professional practice is an essential skill for physicians committed to enhancing their medical knowledge, continuously improving their professional practice, and effectively communicating with workers, employers and communities. This educational activity is intended to provide physicians with an opportunity to refresh their knowledge and ability to critically appraise the scientific evidence and translate it into professional practice. This session will emphasize assessment of fundamental elements of scientific evidence such as study hypothesis and design, methods for data collection, choice of statistical analysis or evaluation criteria, and internal and external validity. Participants will be given an opportunity to assess selected examples from the occupational and environmental medicine literature. Time will also be reserved for questions and sharing tools and resources for critical appraisal. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    216: Occupational and Environmental Cancer-risk Evaluation and Causation
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management

    Faculty:

    Michael L. Fischman*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    James P. Seward*, MD, MPP, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA

    In various settings, occupational physicians are asked to offer opinions regarding the likely risk for cancer associated with occupational or environmental exposures and, in some cases, regarding the causation of a particular individual’s cancer. In this session, we will discuss useful approaches to attempt to address these questions, including some relevant principles and factors, e.g., differing concepts of and criteria for assessing causation, sources of evidence for classification of carcinogenic agents, and dose response and epidemiologic considerations. Specific examples will be used to illustrate these approaches and their limitations with regard to evaluating the impact of chemical and ionizing radiation exposures (including the impact of the Fukishima nuclear reactor disaster).


     

    217: Public Safety Medicine Update 2015
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice

    Faculty:

    L. Kristian Arnold*, MD, MPH, ArLac Global Health Services, Lexington, MA
    Fabrice Czarnecki*, MD, MA, MPH, FACOEM, The Gables Group, Inc., Baltimore, MD
    Edward I. Galaid*, MD, MPH, Roper St. Francis Health Care, Charleston, SC
    Thomas Hales*, MD, MPH, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    David Louis*, MD, MS, FACOEM, Crown Equipment Corporation, New Bremen, OH
    Daniel G. Samo*, MD, FACOEM, Northwestern Medical Group, Chicago, IL

    This session is designed for those wanting to keep up with latest occupational medical guidance for firefighters, law enforcement officers (LEO) and emergency medical service workers. Learn about the complex world of firefighter cancer presumption laws and the evidence linking firefighting and cancer. Explore the causation of firefighter/LEO on-duty cardiovascular events and how physicians can help lower the risk of these events by addressing both behaviors and utilizing non-invasive testing. Review the newest section of ACOEM’s Guidance for the Medical Evaluation of Law Enforcement Officers covering sleep issues and improve skills to evaluate sleep disorders in applicants and incumbents. Finally, dissect the important elements of a LEO pre-placement medical evaluation and construct effective, evidenced-based, LEO new hire exams. In addition to the didactic content, there will be time for real-world questions and discussions with leading public safety medicine researchers and practitioners. This session was organized by the Public Safety Medicine Special Interest Section.


     

    218: Using OEM Principles and Practices as the Foundation of Post-deployment Care in the VA
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM

    Faculty:

    Stephen C. Hunt, MD, Veterans Health Administration, Seattle, WA
    Steven R. Kirkhorn*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Minneapolis VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN
    Jennifer Lipkowitz-Easton*, MD, MPH, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Public Health, Occupational Health Group, Washington, DC

    Since 2003, 2.6 million U.S. military personnel have deployed to combat service in Iraq and Afghanistan. Such service involved “work activities” and environments exposing these individuals to matrix of risks in the physical, psychological and social domains. The VA has adopted an approach to post-deployment care based upon the principles and practices of OEM: 1) taking a history of combat work activities and environments; 2) determining health impacts; and 3) crafting integrated treatment plans oriented toward “recovery and reintegration,” both personal and occupational. The VA model uses integrated medical, mental health and social work teams providing interdisciplinary evaluations, treatment planning and team-based follow-up. By developing this model through the Post-Deployment Integrated Care Initiative (PDICI) and the War Related Injury and Illness Study Centers (WRIISCs) VA is both enhancing post-combat care as well as broadening the reach and stature of OEM as a medical specialty in VA.


     

    219: Practical Uses of the New ACOEM Spine Guidelines
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Jeffrey S. Harris*, MD, MPH, MBA, FACOEM, The Permanente Medical Group, Mill Valley, CA
    Kurt T. Hegmann*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACOEM, University of Utah, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    Kathryn L. Mueller*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Denver, CO

    Back complaints are some of the most common conditions that occupational physicians treat. The new ACOEM back guidelines provide information on the evidence, or lack thereof, for the benefits and harms of common tests, treatments, procedures, and medications used for back complaints. Participants will work in groups to apply these new findings to real-life case scenarios in a workshop setting with the assistance of guideline contributors and experts. We will discuss and apply the best evidence on topics such as: 1) the evidence supporting exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and other non-pharmacologic treatments; 2) the use of medications in acute and chronic back pain; 3) when and how opioids should be used for back pain; and 4) the risks and benefits of surgery and injections versus conservative therapy for common spinal conditions Participants will develop strategies and sequential plans to manage medical care and disability. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. 


     

    220: The Independent Medical Examination
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Douglas W. Martin*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, FAADEP, UnityPoint Clinic, Sioux City, IA

    This session will address the fundamentals of preparing for, conducting, and reporting of the independent medical examination (IME) The speaker will share his 20 years of experience in performing IMEs for a variety of medicolegal benefit systems and discuss important tools of the trade. This course is primarily intended for those occupational physicians who are wanting to incorporate IMEs into their practices or who are just starting out; however, seasoned IME providers may also find the discussion helpful as trends and future visions will also be reviewed. This session was organized by the Private Practice in Occupational Medicine Special Interest Section.

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    221: The FCE: A Demonstration with Enchancements Targeting Disability Prevention
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Michael Caruso, PT, FAAOMPT, Occupational Rehabilitation Associates, Ellicott City, MD

    A functional capacity evaluation (FCE) has been defined as an activity assessment used to make recommendations for participation in work. Although commonly marketed as “proven to objectively determine physical capacity,” FCE results are interpreted more correctly as behavioral tests of functional ability, influenced by a multitude of factors including cognitive, emotional, and physical variables ; pain and pain-related constructs (pain intensity, pain-related fear, pain expectations, and perceived pain control) and always have a subjective component . Pain-related constructs challenge self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is strongly related to good outcomes, while performance on the functional task battery scores and consistency of effort are not. This presentation will demonstrate an approach to the FCE with enhancements that have potential to impact IW self-efficacy.


     

    222: Best Practices in EU Work Disability Management: Implications for the US
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    Jennifer H. Christian*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Webility Corporation, Wayland, MA
    Marianne Cloeren*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Managed Care Advisors, Bethesda, MD
    Richard J. Heron*, MBChB, FRCP, FFOM, FACOEM, BP London, Sunbury-on-Thames, England
    Herman Spanjaard, MD, Dutch Society Occupational Medicine, Utrecht, The Netherlands

    As the U.S. struggles with the economic and social consequences of over-reliance on the medical model and ineffective management of work disability, it may be useful to turn to our colleagues in the European Union (EU) to see what we can learn from them. This session will present an overview of work disability management and systematic approaches to preventing unnecessary work disability in several countries in the EU, with particular focus on what these approaches have meant to the specialty of occupational medicine in these countries. Presenters will use the example of low back injury to explain how this condition would be managed, considering differences if work-related or not. The session will include a period of Q&A. Panelists will include representatives from the UK, the Netherlands, Georgia, and Croatia. This session was organized by the Work Fitness and Disability Special Interest Section.


     

    223: Updates on Epigenetic and Exposure Data on Pesticide and Herbicide Occupational Health Clinician
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management

    Faculty:

    Melissa Perry, PhD, George Washington University School of Public Health, Washington, DC
    Kenneth R. Spaeth*, MD, MPH, MOEH, North Shore LIJ Health System, Great Neck, NY

    This program contains subject matter relating to the latest findings and epidemiological and exposure data regarding pesticide and herbicide toxicity. From effects at the level of the DNA to gene-environment interactions to endocrine disrupting effects. Additionally, there will be updates on biomonitoring including pre-disease biomakers. This session was organized by the Environmental Health Special Interest Section.


     

    224: NASA Occupational Health: Don't Leave Your Planet Without It
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice

    Faculty:

    Vincent J. Michaud, MD, MPH, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, DC

    NASA’s Occupational Health program is responsible for the health of astronauts and those on the ground supporting the space program. Health risks include explosive chemicals, nuclear reactors and the effects of vacuum and microgravity in space. While in space, astronauts rely on NASA’s occupational health program for all their health needs. This session will present NASA’s approach to fitness for duty, managing medical emergencies in space, health effects – including psychological impact of isolation, medical surveillance, and management of work injuries. This session was organized by the Metropolitan Washington College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, an ACOEM component society.

     


     

    225: Implication of Climate Change for Occupational Health Clinicians
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management

    Faculty:

    Peter LaPuma, PhD, PE, CIH, George Washington University, Washington, DC
    William Brett Perkison*, MD, MPH, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    Linsey Rudolph, MD, National Network of Public Health Institutes, Oakland, CA

    This session presents concepts regarding climate change for practicing occupational medicine physicians to help develop health and safety policy for their employer to best mitigate the associated risks. Information will be presented regarding disaster preparedness and health hazard evaluation for industry. An overview of current national policy regarding climate change will also be presented for anticipating changes in regulatory requirements. A presentation will also include ideas regarding sustainable practices for organizations to adopt as public recognition increases about this issue. This session was organized by the Environmental Health Special Interest Section.