• May 3 - 6, 2015

    Hilton Baltimore

    AOHC 2015

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      Pre/Post Conference Courses |  Sunday Sessions |  Monday Sessions |  Tuesday Sessions |  Wednesday Sessions  

    WEDNESDAY SESSIONS – MAY 6  
    Conference Session / Activity Time Credit Hours
    401: Evaluation of a National Public Access Automated External Defibrillator Program in US Federal Buildings 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    402: Deployment Exposures and Respiratory Health Outcomes 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    403: The Business Value of Pre-travel Consultations for International Business Travelers 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    404: Managing Career-limiting Illness and Injury in Physicians: Keeping Docs on the Job 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    405: Work Related Neck Pain: A Physical Therapists Perspective with a Hands-on Laboratory Component 7:00 am - 12:45 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    400: ACOEM Annual Membership Meeting and Breakfast 8:15 am - 10:15 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    406: Does AED Program Medical Control Positively Impact Cardiac Arrest Survival? 10:30 am - 11:30 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    407: Deployment Exposures, Biomarkers and Health Outcomes, and Current Research 10:30 am - 11:30 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    408: MMI: When and How to "Call It A Day" 10:30 am - 11:30 am 1.0 CME / MOC
    409: Occupational Infections and Travel Medicine 10:30 am - 12:45 pm 2.0 CME / MOC
    410: Cardiovascular Diseases and Implantable Cardiac Devices: Workplace Risk Management 11:45 am - 12:54 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    411: VA Burn Pit Registry: Respiratory Diseases and Exposures Among OEF/OIF Deployed Veterans 11:45 am - 12:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    412: Preventing Delayed Recovery in Injured Workers 11:45 am - 12:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    413: Controversies in Hearing Conservation 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    414: Get Ready for Blurry Boundaries: Transitional Work and the ADA's Interactive Process 2:00 pm - 5:15 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    415: Respectful Feedback and Organizational Effectiveness 2:00 pm - 5:15 pm 3.0 CME / MOC

     


     

    401: Evaluation of a National Public Access Automated External Defibrillator Program in US Federal Buildings
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    Bradley Christ, Federal Occupational Health, Bethesda, MD
    Marc Leffer*, MD, MPH, FOCOEM, FAAFP, Federal Occupational Health, Bethesda, MD

    Federal Occupational Health (FOH) administers a national public access automated external defibrillator (AED) program in U.S. federal buildings, overseeing more than 4,000 AEDs in over 1,000 locations. Program management includes physician oversight of AEDs, training of employees in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and AED use, equipment purchase and maintenance, and site-specific consultations for AED protocol development. In this retrospective study of more than 3,250 AEDs installed in U.S. federal buildings under the supervision of FOH between 1999 and 2012, there were 132 reported events in which AEDs were brought to a medical emergency. For those patients who were witnessed to collapse and presented with a shockable rhythm, survival-to-hospital discharge was 39%. This study is the first to specifically examine AED usage in occupational settings in the U.S. These findings demonstrate the value of public access defibrillation in the workplace as well as evidence of the importance of the underlying management systems.


     

    402: Deployment Exposures and Respiratory Health Outcomes
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Joseph H. Abraham, ScD, US Army Public Health Command (USAPHC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Coleen P. Baird*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, US Army Public Health Command (USAPHC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Leslie Clark, MD, MPH, US Army Public Health Command (USAPHC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Timothy M. Mallon*, MD, MPH, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD

    This session will provide an overview of the environmental exposures present in Iraq and Afghanistan and efforts made to identify health risks associated with those exposures. In addition, the session will provide an overview of the work of a Department of Defense workgroup examining respiratory outcomes in a group of service members who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.


     

    403: The Business Value of Pre-travel Consultations for International Business Travelers
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice

    Faculty:

    Stephanie Estala, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, Chevron, Houston, TX
    Stephen Frangos*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Chevron, Houston, TX

    The pre-travel health consultation is a detailed approach to preparing business travelers for safe international business travel. The components of the consultation will be reviewed, the business drivers for the consultation will be discussed, the impact of personal health on pre-travel preparation and overall safety of travel will be reviewed, and the safeguards that are available for mitigating risk will be described. In addition, during business pre-travel consultations (BPTC), medical issues may be identified that pose significant health risk to business travelers (BT). The Houston Clinic will evaluate health data from a cohort of employee BT who were required to have an Angola Certificate of Health (COH). These employees undergo a focused/brief physical evaluation to fulfill a country visa requirement for Angola that is applied to business travelers across the OpCos based on the length of their time in country. The COH exams will be reviewed for significant medical issues that were identified, both newly diagnosed and pre-existing that are found to be uncontrolled during the consultation , actions taken to address the uncontrolled medical conditions such as additional employee medical follow up or deferred or canceled business travel and for the compliance with the recommended actions by the employee. The data will be analyzed for BTs that identify one or more international destinations. The implications for international travel health and safety risk and potential impact to the business will be presented to the audience as a general overview and will summarize the statistics around some of the health issues we identify and our risk mitigation follow up. The result of this health data analysis will provide business operations critical insight into the health state of BT and serve as a guidepost for promoting healthy behaviors, stressing the importance of stabilizing chronic disease prior to traveling internationally and obtaining the BPTC.


     

    404: Managing Career-limiting Illness and Injury in Physicians: Keeping Docs on the Job
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    William G. Buchta*, MD, MS, MPH, FACOEM, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Phil Hagen, MD, FACPM, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Robin G. Molella*, MD, MPH, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Richard D. Newcomb*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

    Demands on the sustainability of our physician workforce are growing due the physical and cognitive challenges posed by new practices, expectations for ever safer more accessible and less costly care, and the aging of the health care workforce. Prevention of career-limiting illness and injury in physicians is increasingly critical but little studied. The complexity and safety aspects of medical practice pose unique return to work decision-making challenges. A case-based discussion synthesizing research that characterizes the nature of threats physicians’ face, with return to work tools such as practice simulation, and ergonomic interventions, calendar management, safety and systems interventions and supervisory support will be presented.


     

    405: Work Related Neck Pain: A Physical Therapists Perspective with a Hands-on Laboratory Component
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty: 

    David A. Hoyle, DPT, MA, OCS, MTC, CEAS, Select Medical WorkStrategies, Storrs, CT
    Katie McBee, PT, DPT, OCS, MS, CEAS, Select Medical, Louisville, KY

    This program presents the etiology of complaints involving neck pain. Current evidence about occupational and personal risk factors for the development of neck pain will be presented. Evaluation and treatment of the non-surgical injury by physical therapists will be presented. Half of the session will be devoted to small group laboratory sessions for demonstration and practice of cervical evaluation skills. Information as to the sensitivity and specificity of testing compared to gold standards will be presented. Exercises and manual techniques commonly used in physical therapy and the evidence to support those procedures will be reviewed within small groups.


     

    406: Does AED Program Medical Control Positively Impact Cardiac Arrest Survival?
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Delia Braun*, MD, JD, Emergency University, Redwood City, CA
    Thomas T. Holloway, PhD, US Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, DC
    Frank Poliafico, RN, Emergency University, Redwood City, CA

    ACOEM was the first organization to develop automated external defibrillator (AED) program guidelines, including the clear need for medical direction. Many AED programs obtain a prescription for medical direction over the Internet. Rarely, does the prescribing physician interact with program leaders. Have AED programs suffered from the lack of physician involvement? We have spent more than $30B purchasing AEDs, training and program management without increasing cardiac arrest survival rates. Absent medical leadership, PAD programs don’t focus on improving clinical outcomes. Selecting the brand, number/location of AEDs, and training has been the goal, but has not resulted in survival. Is there evidence that programs with active physician involvement achieve better outcomes for SCA victims? What can physicians do to rectify the poor performance of AED programs? Authors will discuss the medical director’s role in AED programs that have achieved top SCA survival rates, including the Federal Aviation Administration’s.


     

    407: Deployment Exposures, Biomarkers and Health Outcomes, and Current Research
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Dean P. Jones, PhD, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
    Timothy M. Mallon*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD
    Patricia Rohrbeck, DrPH, MPH, CPH, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Silver Spring, MD
    Mark J. Utell, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY

    This session will focus on current Department of Defense (DoD) research on burn pit exposed service members, metabolomics and inflammatory serum biomarkers and health outcomes. A study group of 200 exposed service members who worked at burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan were identified along with 200 non-deployed service members were served as controls. Breathing zone and area sampling data were collected on the 200 exposed service members who deployed between 2007 and 2011. Pre- and post-deployment serum samples were obtained and analyzed for metabolomic and inflammatory biomarkers along with PAH and dioxin levels. These results were compared to serum sample results for 200 service members who did not deploy to Irag or Afghanistan. These exposure and biomarkers data were then linked to demographic and health outcomes data including respiratory and cancer outcomes to examine the risk of adverse health outcomes related to burn-pit exposures while deployed. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.

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    408: MMI: When and How to "Call It A Day"
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    James W. Butler*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAsMA, CEDIR, Orthopaedic Associates, Evansville, IN

    Maximum Medical Improvement (MMI) is a critical stage in workers’ compensation cases and a goal of most stakeholders. It is often not easily achieved since so many do not understand it. An approach to determining using the many treatment guidelines presently available and mandated by different jurisdictions will be presented.

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    409: Occupational Infections and Travel Medicine
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Francesca K. Litow*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    Michael Sauri*, MD, MPH&TM, FACP, FACPM, FACOEM, FRSTM&H, CTropMed, Occupational Health Consutlants, Rockville, MD

    This session will review increasingly important areas of occupational medicine practice involving the prevention and control of infections in the workplace: occupational infections (including blood-borne pathogens) and travel medicine.

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    410: Cardiovascular Diseases and Implantable Cardiac Devices: Workplace Risk Management
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Guillaume Girard, PhD.Eng, Medtronic, Inc., Moundsview, MN
    Timothy L. Newman*, MD, FirstEnergy Corp, Akron, OH

    Cardiovascular diseases are increasingly prevalent in the workforce as are the use of cardiac pacers and defibrillators for treatment. Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the workplace potentially interferes with many implantable devices and poses a risk to individual health and safety. National standards for the assessment of electromagnetic interference with medical devices are still in development. This discussion will provide an overview of cardiac diseases and implantable devices and an update to emerging standards to address workplace health and safety risks. A protocol for risk management assessment, developed for the electric utility industry, will be provided for reference.

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    411: VA Burn Pit Registry: Respiratory Diseases and Exposures Among OEF/OIF Deployed Veterans
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Shannon K. Barth, MPH, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Public Health, Washington, DC
    Paul Ciminera*, MD, MPH, Veterans Health Administration, Washington, DC
    Eric Garshick, MD, MOH, VA Boston Healthcare System, Roxbury, MA
    Sybil W. Morley, MPH, Office of Public Health, Veterans Health Administration, Canadaigua, NY
    Susan P. Proctor, DSc, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA

    Veterans deployed to Southwest Asia were exposed to high levels of respirable particulate matter. This presentation provides an update on the Veterans Adnministration (VA)/Department of Defense response to exposure health concerns and new VA Burn Pit Registry. The prevalence of respiratory outcomes among Veterans will be examined. The correlations between respiratory diseases and various environmental exposures will be explored. The changes to respiratory health questionnaire will be outlined regarding exposure, disease, and smoking. The last part of the session will provide an update on research from the VA Cooperative Studies on Respiratory Health and Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. The association between exposures and measures of respiratory health among veterans who served after 2001 will be examined. Higher particulate levels are likely associated with poorer pulmonary function. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.

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    412: Preventing Delayed Recovery in Injured Workers
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Marcos A. Iglesias*, MD, MMM, FAAFP, FACOEM, The Hartford, Valley Park, MO

    Bob and Joe are the same age, they work together doing the same job and suffered the same injury. Bob returned to work after a short course of treatment. Joe is still off work 2 years later. Many workers have simple musculoskeletal injuries. Some recover quickly without problems, yet others suffer from significant delays in their recovery. Why? What are the factors that predispose an injured worker to go down the path of delayed recovery? How can physicians quickly identify those at highest risk? And, most importantly, what measures can we take to help the injured worker recover their life speedily? This session will focus on practical tools and techniques to help minimize injured worker disability and delayed recovery.

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    413: Controversies in Hearing Conservation
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Patrick R. Laraby*, MD, MPH, MS, MBA, FACOEM, US Navy, Falls Church, VA
    Kurt Yankaskas, MD, Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA

    Patrick R. Laraby*, MD, MPH, MS, MBA, FACOEM, US Navy, Falls Church, VA
    Kurt Yankaskas, MD, Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA

    Hearing conservation continues to be a difficult issue for Occupational Health. Just within DoD, this cost the Veteran's Administration over $2 Billion annually. The DoD has placed a lot of resources and energy into cutting edge hearing conservation. The presenter is a world expert in noise control and hearing conservation and will present issues and interventions in hearing conservation that is of value to the all occupational medicine providers inside and outside of the DoD.

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    414: Get Ready for Blurry Boundaries: Transitional Work and the ADA's Interactive Process
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Catherine J. Baranek, BS, MBA, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC
    Jennifer H. Christian*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Webility Corporation, Wayland, MA
    Aaron Konopasky, JD, PhD, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Washington, DC
    Ann Kuhnen*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, The Hartford, Hartford, CT
    Stephen Lebau, JD, Lebau & Neuworth, LLC, Towson, MD
    Beth Loy, PhD, Job Accommodation Network (JAN), Morgantown, WV
    Eric Paltell, Esq., Kollman & Saucier, P.A., Baltimore, MD

    The terms “temporary transitional work” and “interactive process” are not heard together – but they will be soon. Come to this session so you can prepare to make changes in your practice that will help your employer clients comply with changing expectations, and help your patients keep their jobs. Until now, companies that have pro-active absence management and workers’ comp programs have not traditionally included the affected employee while supervisors are deciding whether they can find work within temporary work restrictions and limitations that were set by the treating physician. EEOC says this needs to change. Recent guidance has shortened the interval before the ADA’s protections apply down to days (not weeks or months). This is in addition to broadening the definition a qualified person with a disability. California’s equivalent law (FEMA) explicitly has had no waiting period at all. In this session, a panel of experts will describe the rationale for blurring boundaries between a person with a short-term medical problem and “a qualified person with a disability.” Staff from EEOC and the Job Accommodation Network also want to hear from us about what would help us provide better support to your patients and their employers.

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    415: Respectful Feedback and Organizational Effectiveness
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    David Frances*, PhD, Quadrant Health Strategies, Inc, Beverly, MA

    Feedback is key to successful leadership, management, and interpersonal relationships; and how it is delivered typically determines whether it will be heard or not. Effective feedback is generally respectful feedback, the mechanics of which are generally ignored during the lengthy education of OEM professionals. This session is designed to fill in this communication skills gap, and to do so in an engaging format that has been employed in many organizational settings. This workshop will provide an opportunity to learn the four essential components of respectful feedback, suitable for use in every workplace context including: executive teams, cross-functional collaborations, performance discussions, and day-to-day operations. This session will demonstrate what "respectful feedback" looks like in a variety of OEM organizational, leadership and management situations; guide participants to deliver respectful feedback using descriptive language, impact statements, and I-statements; describe why active listening is an essential ingredient in effective relationships; provide an opportunity to initiate skill development; and provide follow-up materials for carry-over to participants’ real-life environments.

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