• April 23 - April 26, 2017

    Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel

    AOHC 2017

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  • AOHC 2017 - April 23-26
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  • AOHC Sessions

      Pre/Post Conference Courses |  Sunday Sessions |  Monday Sessions |  Tuesday Sessions |  Wednesday Sessions  

    MONDAY SESSIONS – APRIL 24    
    Conference Session / Activity   Time Credit Hours
    200: What Constitutes Excellence: The Best Corporate Health and Safety Programs in America 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    201: Opportunities for Integrating Health and Protection and Health Promotion 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    202: Becoming an ACOEM Fellow 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    203: The Independent Medical Examination 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    204: ACOEM Legislative and Government Affairs Update: Recent Wins and Ongoing Challenges 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    205: Restoring Function and Return-to-Work after Spinal Cord Injury: PEAK Strategies 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    206: OEM and Human Factors: Collaborative Efforts and Update 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    207: What You Can Do with the COHE Model: Implications for Action 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    208: MRO Controversies 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    209: What Can We Learn About Back Pain and Work Using Population-based Data from the NHIS 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    210: Resident Research Abstract Presentations 8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    211: OSHA/NIOSH Investigations: Exploring Newly Emerging and Persistent Occupational Scourges  8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    212: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Addressing the International Epidemic of CKDu in Agricultural Workers   10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    213: Responsibilities of the OEM Physician in the Treatment and Prevention of Climate Change Related Health Problems 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    214: Sit vs Stand: Optimal Combinations for Managing Low Back Pain 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    215: What Physicians Need to Know About Healthcare Ergonomics: Safe Patient Handling and Beyond 10:30 am - 3:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    216: TED2: The Best of OEM 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    217: Drug Formularies in Workers’ Compensation  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    218: OEM and Workplace Wellness: Paving the Way for Value-driven Population Health 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    219: The Beryllium Standard: From Science to Policy 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    220: Compliance, Compassion, and Company: Differing Perspectives on Effective Return-to-Work Practices 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    221: Creating Your Own OEM Elevator Pitch 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC 
    222: Multi-pronged Approach for Addressing Opioids and Chronic Pain Management in Colorado 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    223: Psychological Fitness-for-Duty Toolkit for Occupational Medicine: Threat Preparedness, Assessment, and Response 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    224: Promising Practices to Promote Commercial Driver Wellness 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    225: The New OSHA Silica Standards 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    226: Gulf War Illness: Clinical and Research Recommendations and Controversies 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    227: ACOEM’s Maintenance of Certification, Part IV 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm  1 CME / MOC
    228: So, You Want to Be an ACOEM Leader? 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    229: Firearm Injury: Facts, Myths, and What the Science Tells Us 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    230: A Guide for the Primary Care Physician in Evaluating Disocyanate Exposed Workers 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    231: Conversion Disorder and Functional Neurological Conditions 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    232: IOMSC: Update and Future Directions 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC

     

    200: What Constitutes Excellence: The Best Corporate Health and Safety Programs in America
    TRACK: Other
     

    Faculty:

    Stewart R. Curtis*, DO, MPH, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID
    Fikry W. Isaac*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Wellworld Consulting, Sarasota, FL

    The Corporate Health Achievement Award (CHAA) was first presented in 1997 to recognize organizations for their outstanding, comprehensive array of programs dedicated to protecting and improving the safety, health, and productivity of their workforces. During this session, 2017 CHAA recipients will discuss those aspects of their health programs that may serve as model practices for occupational and environmental medicine and highlight qualities of excellence identified by reviewers. These companies continue to demonstrate that building a culture of health and safety by focusing on the well-being and safety aspects of the workplace yields greater value when compared to companies that do not adhere to CHAA standards. This year's recipient is the Idaho National Laboratory.


     

    201: Opportunities for Integrating Health and Protection and Health Promotion
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Janis Davis-Street*, MS, EdD, CHES, Chevron, Houston, TX
    Stephen A. Frangos*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Chevron Corporation, Houston, TX

    Total Worker Health® (TWH) is a NIOSH/CDC strategy that proposes that integrating occupational safety and health with worksite health promotion results in a “synergism of prevention” to improve the health of the workforce. This session will identify two key areas where health promotion programming has begun to be integrated with health protection practices in multiple settings within a multinational oil company. The evidence base supporting health as an enabler of safety and productivity will be presented with specific focus on sleep and obesity. Leveraging standard process improvement techniques, the session will describe the evolution of whole-person health strategies that focus on sleep health and weight management as a means of improving health, safety and human performance. Success factors and challenges that accompany the implementation of TWH in a decentralized company will be discussed. 


     

    202: Becoming an ACOEM Fellow
    TRACK: Other      
     

    Faculty:  

    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA

    Fellow is the highest classification of membership in ACOEM. Fellowship distinguishes and recognizes members of the College for their training, accomplishments, and experience in occupational medicine at the national, component, and local levels, as well as the member’s academic and scientific contributions. The Committee of Fellowship Examiners feels passionately that the College needs more Fellows and that those who are making significant contributions to the College and the field of occupational and environmental medicine deserve special recognition. Come to this session to learn about the Fellowship application process. 


     

    203: The Independent Medical Examination
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM

    Faculty:

    Douglas Wayne Martin*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, FIAIME, Unity Point Clinic – St. Luke’s Occupational Medicine, Sioux City, IA

    This session will cover the basics and fundamentals of providing an independent medical examination (IME). The session will cover how to start an IME practice and some of the business pitfalls to avoid. It will discuss the methodology of record review and also skills for performance of history taking and for the physical exam. Lastly, the session will cover the importance and significance of creating a well-written and defensible report. This session was organized by the Private Practice in Occupational Medicine Special Interest Section. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. 


     

    204: ACOEM Legislative and Government Affairs Update: Recent Wins and Ongoing Challenges
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Pamela Hymel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, Anaheim, CA
    Robert K. McLellan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH
    Patrick O'Connor*, Kent & O'Connor, Inc., Washington, DC
    Paul J. Papanek*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Cal/OSHA, Long Beach, CA

    This session will cover ACOEM’s recent activities in government affairs including what ACOEM is doing about health care reform, opioid policy, OEM residency funding, TSCA, lead poisoning, DOT and sleep apnea, OSHA regulations, GINA; and other topics of current interest. The session will also highlight a number of difficult policy issues that ACOEM faces as a nationally recognized policy leader in OEM and preventive medicine, including controversies about gun safety legislation, global climate change, and credentialing of health care providers. Lastly, the session will help the attendee understand the political climate in Washington as it relates to the house of medicine.


     

    205: Restoring Function and Return-to-Work after Spinal Cord Injury: PEAK Strategies
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research

    Faculty:

    Candace Tefertiller, PT, DPT, NCS, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO

    Approximately 12,000 individuals sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI) each year. In 2016, the mean age of individuals who experienced a SCI was 40.2 years which means that the majority were also engaged in the workforce. Historically, it has been challenging for individuals to return-to-work after an SCI due to ongoing health-related issues, as well as mobility limitations. However, there have been recent technological advancements that have facilitated greater recovery of function and mobility after a SCI allowing many individuals to return to their previous employment. These advancements have also led to the development of activity-based therapy community centers which provide ongoing access and support. This presentation will review recent technological advancements that have resulted in improved mobility and wellness outcomes and will be supported by case studies depicting healthy and productive individuals who have returned to work after a SCI.


     

    206: OEM and Human Factors: Collaborative Efforts and Update
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Andrew S. Imada, PhD, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Santa Monica, CA
    William S. Marras, PhD, CPE, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
    Amy May, MC, CPE, The Boeing Company, Seattle, WA
    David Rempel*, MD, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    Mark A. Roberts*, MD, PhD, FACOEM, Exponent, Inc., Chicago, IL

    Today’s workplaces are challenged to accommodate for a multitude of factors from generational differences, anthropomorphic changes, varying operational processes, as well as cultural diversity. This session will explore the role of human factors and ergonomics professionals in the workplace on improving safety and health. Brief presentations will be made on the application of a systems approach to workplace safety and health; design principles to accommodate workers, especially those who are overweight and aging; and accommodating the injured worker in return to work. The moderator will encourage comments and questions from the audience. The goal will be to identify workplace situations where these factors work well with OEM to achieve a common goal of maintaining a healthy and productive workplace and workforce.

     
     

    207: What You Can Do with the COHE Model: Implications for Action
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Paul J. Allen*, MD, Confluence Health, Wenatchee, WA
    Dianna Chamblin*, MD, The Everett Clinic, Evert, WA
    Jennifer Christian*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Webility Corporation, Wayland, MA
    Nicole Cushman, COHE Alliance of Western Washington, Tacoma, WA
    Benjamin D. Doornink, St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute, Spokane, WA
    Karen L. Nilson*, MD, Valley Medical Center, Renton, WA
    Thomas Wickizer, PhD, MD, College of Public Health, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    This session explores the implications of Washington State’s highly successful community-based Centers for Occupational Health and Education (COHE) program for occupational medicine physicians outside Washington State, whether they are in clinical practice or in entrepreneurial, managerial or executive roles. This session begins with a brief overview of the COHE community-based “best practices” model for management of work injuries and its well-documented good results: increased worker and employer satisfaction, improved functional outcomes, reduced lost work days and job loss, and a $4,000 reduction in mean cost per claim. The majority of the session will be spent exploring main opportunities to exploit COHE’s success in other settings.Take advantage of the quantitative evidence that the COHE program has produced to market occupational medicine practices or related businesses and implement an approach similar to COHE outside Washington. The COHE model is a public health/healthcare delivery innovation to upgrade the quality of care across whole communities or regions. Employers or insurers in other jurisdictions may view an adapted COHE model as a good solution for areas in which there is a shortage of trained occupational medicine physicians. This session was organized by the Work Fitness and Disability Special Interest Section.

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    208: MRO Controversies
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Karl Auerbach, MD, MS, MBA, FACOEM, Pulse Occupational Medicine, Greece, NY
    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA
    Paula Lantsberger*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Occupational Medicine Associates, Spokane, WA
    Douglas Wayne Martin*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, FIAIME, Unity Point Clinic – St. Luke’s Occupational Medicine, Sioux City, IA

    The session is intended to cover topics that are not traditionally the focus of standard medical review officer (MRO) educational or training programs. The session will include updates on Department of Transportation focal points from the prior year and also address difficult MRO issues, including medicinal or state specific legal recreational marijuana use, and fitness-for-duty issues. The session will end with an MRO Jeopardy game show comprised of audience contestants that is used as a fun way to refresh MRO knowledge and its application. This session was organized by the Medical Review Officers Special Interest Section.


     

    209: What Can We Learn About Back Pain and Work Using Population-based Data from the NHIS
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Matthew Groenewold, PhD, CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Ming-Lun Lu, PhD, CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Sara Luckhaupt*, MD, MPH, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
     

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the leading contributors to OSHA-recordable injuries/illnesses and workers’ compensation claims. But cases of LBP included in these statistics likely only represent a small proportion of all LBP cases related to work because there are many barriers to both the recognition of work-relatedness and to reporting. Population-based data about LBP among all US adults, including workers, is available from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The annual core NHIS includes one question about LBP, and the 1988 and 2015 occupational health supplements (OHS) included additional questions about LBP and its risk factors. In this session, NIOSH investigators will describe the NHIS, new estimates of the burden of LBP, and the prevalence of physical and psychosocial risk factors for LBP among US workers based on the 2015 NHIS-OHS, and NIOSH’s efforts to develop a workforce musculoskeletal pain surveillance tool.


     

    210: Resident Research Abstract Presentations
    TRACK: Other
     

    Faculty:

    John D. Meyer*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (Moderator)
    Craig Paul Anderson*, DO, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD
    Brent Jones*, MD, MHI, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD
    Pearlene Lee*, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Remington L. Nevin*, MD, MPH, DrPH, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    Mellisa Pensa*, MD, MPH, Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine, New Haven, CT
    Gabriel C. Pepper*, MD, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
    Charles F. Prezzia*, MD, MOH, The Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    Dwayne Wilson*, MD, University of South Florida, Tampa, Fl

    This session will provide residents in occupational and environmental medicine with a forum to present current and cutting-edge research. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    211: OSHA/NIOSH Investigations: Exploring Newly Emerging and Persistent Occupational Scourges
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research 
     

    Faculty:

    Bruce Bernard, MD, MPH, CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Judith Eisenberg, MD, MS, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Kathleen Fagan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Richard J. Thomas*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Federal OSHA, Washington, DC
    Aaron Tustin, MD, MPH, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Douglas Wiegand, PhD, CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH

    NIOSH and OSHA investigators will present a series of presentations on recent workplace investigations and health-hazard evaluations. Faculty will describe the workplace settings, the specific approaches involving workplace exposures and medical aspects of the cases, the investigation results, and the recommendations to employees, employers, and other stakeholders. Implications for occupational medicine practice, regulations, research, worker and employer education, and public health practice will be explored. Issues to be addressed will include a combination of newly emerging occupational exposures and illnesses, as well as those exposures which remain the scourge of workers decades after the health risks have been recognized. Time for questions and discussion will be included. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     
    212: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Addressing the International Epidemic of CKDu in Agricultural Workers
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM


    Faculty:

    Claudia Asensio, DrPH, RN, Pantaleon Group, Guatemala City, Guatemala
    Jaime Butler-Dawson, PhD, MPH, University of Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO
    Lee S. Newman*, MD, FACOEM, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Denver, CO
    Liliana Tenney, MPH, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO

    Recent research has confirmed that workers employed by sugar cane plantations and other agribusinesses are in an international epidemic of chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu), also referred to as Mesoamerican Nephropathy. CKDu largely affects adult men who do not have traditional causes of chronic kidney failure and who work under conditions of high heat and physical exertion in Latin America and parts of Asia. Many theories have been proffered to explain this epidemic. Our team of physicians, exposure scientists, physiologists, epidemiologists, and others is collaborating with companies in Guatemala that are committed to corporate social responsibility to address CKDu, using a Total Worker Health® approach. This session will report what is currently known about the epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms, interventions, and implications. The session will also examine the pivotal role that occupational medicine can play in addressing this global threat to worker health and productivity. This session was organized by the Rocky Mountain Academy of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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    213: Responsibilities of the OEM Physician in the Treatment and Prevention of Climate Change Related Health Problems
    TRACK:  
     

    Faculty:

    Margaret Cook-Shimanek, MD, MPH, Resources for Environmental and Occupational Health, Missoula, MT
    Tee Guidotti*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, O+EH&M, Washington, DC
    Ronda B. McCarthy*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, City of Waco Employee Health Services, Concentra, Waco, TX
    Ismail Nabeel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mount Sinai Health Systems, New York, NY
    Mellisa Pensa*, MD, MPH, Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine, New Haven, CT
    William B. Perkison*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, TX
    Poune Saberi*, MD, MPH, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Paul Schulte, PhD, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH

    An overview of the occupational health effects of climate change on workers will be presented. Following an audience discussion, a panel will present their proposed ACOEM position paper stating the responsibilities of the occupational and environmental medicine physician in the treatment and prevention of climate change related health problems. This session was organized by the Environmental Health Special Interest Section, in conjunction with the Underserved Occupational Populations Special Interest Section.


     

    214: Sit vs Stand: Optimal Combinations for Managing Low Back Pain 
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Jack P. Callaghan, PhD, CCPE, FCSB, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
    Fred Gerr*, MD, FACOEM, University of Iowa, College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA
    David Rempel*, MD, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA

    Among office workers, low back pain can be associated with prolonged sitting or standing. This session will review recent epidemiologic findings linking low back pain among sedentary workers to the duration of sitting or standing in the workplace. In addition, recent laboratory studies of sedentary workers with low back pain have investigated a range of patterns of sitting and standing to identify combinations that are associated with the greatest relief of pain. Both, epidemiological and laboratory/mechanistic studies examining effects of sitting and standing on back pain will be reviewed. 


     

    215: What Physicians Need to Know About Healthcare Ergonomics: Safe Patient Handling and Beyond
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Laura Breeher*, MD, MS, MPH, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Debra Milek*, MD, PhD, MPH, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    Wilma Traughber, MSN, RN-BC, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
    Andrew I. S. Vaughn*, MD, MPH, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Mamie Williams, MPH, MSN, FNP-BC, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

    Musculoskeletal injuries are the leading cause of disability in health care and related fields. While 11 states have established requirements for safe patient handling (SPH) and there have been efforts to create a national requirement for SPH programs, for most health care workers patient handling remains a major hazard. Representatives from major medical centers will share lessons learned from experience with implementing and supporting safe patient handling programs. Data demonstrating the value and efficacy of SPH will be discussed. Innovative ideas for proactively addressing ergonomic challenges posed by other healthcare activities will be highlighted, including tips and tools for increasing comfort and reducing injuries in diverse areas throughout a facility from housekeeping to imaging. The Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) tool will also be introduced which can be used for objective measurement in ergonomic evaluation of a task. This session was organized by the Medical Center Occupational Health Special Interest Section.


     

    216: TED2: The Best of OEM
    TRACK: Other  
     

    Faculty:

    Constantine Gean*, MD, FACOEM, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Glendale, CA
    Kent W. Peterson*, MD, FACOEM, Occupational Health Strategies, Charlottesville, VA

    TED1, presented at the 2015 AOHC in Baltimore, focused on practical skills and tools for improving presentation effectiveness in order to take presenters from “good” to “great” to “outstanding.” TED2 speakers will apply these skills in short, dynamic presentations that succinctly communicate OEM’s top contributions to the world, to employers, workers and communities. The session will address the question, “What is OEM’s competitive advantage?” (Restated, what simple key lessons could employers and workers learn from a hundred years of OEM experience?) Top contributions are selected based on dialog, literature reviews and interaction with the speakers. The session will showcase well-documented, evidence-based workplace policies, programs, practices skills and tools that give OEM professionals competitive advantage. TED1 speakers will coach bright, articulate future OEM leaders to summarize the best evidence of OEM’s top contributions to society.


     

    217: Drug Formularies in Workers’ Compensation
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Robert Goldberg*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, HealtheSystems, Lafayette, CA
    Paul J. Papanek*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Cal/OSHA, Long Beach, CA
    Alex Swedlow, MHSA, California Workers’ Compensation Institute, Oakland, CA

    In the last few years, several states have recently moved to implement drug formularies in their workers’ compensation systems. Additionally, at least two commercial formularies are already in widespread use for patients treated under workers’ compensation. This session will describe the general structure and operation of drug formularies, provide information and their use in practice in several states, and will provide a practical introduction to currently available workers’ compensation drug formularies.


     

    218: OEM and Workplace Wellness: Paving the Way for Value-driven Population Health
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM
     

    Faculty:

    Harris Allen, PhD, Harris Allen Group, Atlanta, GA
    Paul Brandt-Rauf*, DrPH, MD, ScD, FACOEM, University of Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, IL
    William B. Bunn*, MD, JD, MPH, FACOEM, Medical University of South Carolina, Hilton Head Island, SC
    Jeremy Nobel, MD, MPH, MS, Northeast Business Group on Health, New York, NY

    As concerns over mediocre health outcomes and off-the-charts health care spending intensify, strategies for improving population health and health care value have been gaining traction along largely separate tracks. Their fusion and the synergies that result have yet to be explicitly embraced. Workplace wellness has evolved as a major exception as leading employers have become better performers in their stakeholder role – and propelled and modeled the use of an emerging science, value-driven population health (VDPH) – by blending elements from both and achieving major gains in health, well-being, and performance while reining in health care costs. OEM has a leading role to play in advancing the use of VDPH by these purchasers and broadening its uptake in the marketplace by other purchasers and stakeholders. This session will focus on how workplace wellness has helped forge the emerging science of VDPH and what OEM policymakers and practitioners can do to accelerate its uptake. 


     

    219: The Beryllium Standard: From Science to Policy
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management  
     

    Faculty:

    Alisa M. Koval*, MD, MPH, MHSA, Denver Health/COSH, Denver, CO
    Lisa Maier*, MD, MSPH, FCCP, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO
    Margaret M. Mroz, MSPH, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO
    Lee S. Newman*, MD, FACOEM, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Denver, CO

    This session will bring together a group of experts in the science and policy of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a lung condition that workers can develop when particles of beryllium or beryllium compounds are inhaled. In addition, beryllium is a known carcinogen linked to lung cancer. Currently, OSHA enforces a 40-year-old permissable exposure limit (PEL) for beryllium in general industry, construction, and shipyards, which does not adequately protect workers against health effects, especially CBD. This session will explore the historical context and epidemiology of occupational beryllium exposure and disease, as well as the current understanding of the mechanisms of health effects and the current state of diagnosis and treatment of CBD, from the viewpoint of both physician and patient. This session will not only be relevant to the current OSHA beryllium standard, but will present an approach that can translate science into policy that should be applied to other occupational hazards. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    220: Compliance, Compassion, and Company: Differing Perspectives on Effective Return-to-Work Practices
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 
     

    Faculty:

    Kate Bischoff, SHRM-SCP, SPHR, tHRive Law & Consulting, LLC, Minneapolis, MN
    Rebecca Briley, SHRM-SCP, EFCU Financial Federal Credit Union, Baton Rouge, LA
    Peter Matos*, DO, MPH, FACOEM, FACPM, Traekos Health, Amana, IA

    This session brings together experts in human resources, occupational medicine, and legal to present the perspectives of business, health, and compliance on effective return-to-work practices. The human resources perspective will describe the importance of adhering to a policy that focuses on the organization's mission and purpose while also following the law. An outline a successful FMLA process will be described. The perspective of the health care provider will emphasize the importance of good communication among all stakeholders, as well as access to expert occupational medicine physicians and active case management. The legal perspective outlines the laws that organizations must be aware of and the obligations that they have when bringing employees back to work. Return-to-work scenarios with practical applications will be discussed.


     

    221: Creating Your Own OEM Elevator Pitch
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Kent W. Peterson*, MD, FACOEM, Occupational Health Strategies, Charlottesville, VA

    Can you confidently explain your work to a stranger during a 2-minute ride up an elevator? Can you gain attention, interest, and understanding in your profession in a few short sentences? Can you help your staff quickly explain to a caller what your office does? This hands-on workshop will guide you step-by-step through a process to create your own 2-minute OEM TED Talk. Come prepared to learn, create, coach and be coached, speak, critique and be critiqued, and triumphantly exhort your essence. You will leave with simple, powerful tools for self expression and your personally crafted OEM elevator pitch. If you are a star, you may win a spot on ACOEM's website. Participants only; not for observers.


     

    222: Multi-pronged Approach for Addressing Opioids and Chronic Pain Management in Colorado
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Richard Garrett May, MD, Pinnacol Assurance, Denver, CO
    Liliana Tenney, MPH, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO
    Robert Valuck, PhD, RPh, FNAP, University of Colorado School of Pharmacy, Aurora, CO

    Prescription drug misuse and abuse is a serious problem both nationally and in Colorado. Each year, overdose deaths from opioid painkillers alone number approximately 17,000 nationally and 300 in Colorado. Such deaths are now more common than alcohol-related traffic fatalities. The CDC calls prescription drug overdose deaths one of the four most serious epidemics facing the nation. Enough opioid painkillers are dispensed by pharmacies in the US to supply each and every American citizen with enough pills to take one every four hours, around the clock, for a month. To address this problem, Colorado convened experts from across the state to create the Colorado Plan to Reduce Rx Abuse and a consortium, which addresses public awareness, naloxone, disposal, surveillance, and provider and prescriber education. This session will discuss the statewide efforts and impact that has resulted from policies, workers’ compensation, provider training, and new guidelines. 


     

    223: Psychological Fitness-for-Duty Toolkit for Occupational Medicine: Threat Preparedness, Assessment, and Response
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Michael Coupland*, Rpsych, IMCS Group, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
    Les Kertay*, PhD, ABPP, FIAIME, R3 Continuum, Chattanooga, TN
    Michael J. Levine*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Occupational Medical Consultant, Williamsburg, VA

    The occupational medicine physician is the gatekeeper in the preparedness and response to threats in the workplace. This includes employees who display behavior that is deemed to be threatening, from the employee’s family members or significant others that bring domestic violence into the workplace, to non-employee violence or threat of violence that impacts the workplace. This presentation will guide participants in developing a plan, starting with a preparedness audit for the identification, referral triggers, and the preparation and report responses for undertaking a threat assessment psychological fitness-for-duty referral. The Psychological Fitness for Duty Toolkit will be updated with threat assessment referral triggers, case identifiers, and referral letters and forms. A threat response section will present the interventions that may be required arising from a threat arising from a threat assessment fitness for duty or arising from other workplace triggers.


     

    224: Promising Practices to Promote Commercial Driver Wellness
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA
    Pamela Hymel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, Anaheim, CA
    Michele D. Smith, PhD, MSN, CRNP, Erickson Living - Ann's Choice, Warminster, PA
    Craig D. Thorne*, MD, MPH, MBA, FACOEM, Erickson Living, Baltimore, MD

    Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) operators are expected to meet specific federal medical standards. It has been long recognized that as a population, CMV operators are at high risk for many medical conditions which could impact their certification as well as their long-term health and productivity. Some medical examiners may be able to play a dual role in the process, serving both as a certifying examiner and at the same time being able to actively promote health and wellness in their driver population. This session will highlight many of the wellness opportunities and tools available that occupational health professionals may utilize to promote better health and wellness for drivers. Presenters include experts in commercial driver medical requirements and employee health, wellness, and lifestyle management. Specific promising practice examples from companies that have proactively instituted driver wellness programs will be presented. 


     

    225: The New OSHA Silica Standards
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Kathleen Fagan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Robert Harrison*, MD, MPH, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    Paul J. Papanek*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Cal/OSHA, Long Beach, CA

    The newly enacted OSHA silica standard takes effect in mid-2017 and includes new requirements for employers who may be clients of occupational medicine providers, along with new requirements for medical surveillance. This session will outline the background information about the reason for the standard’s adoption, key elements of the standard, and controversies involved with surveillance exams of workers with findings consistent with various stages of silicosis, including TB screening, additional consults, and the longitudinal use of imaging studies. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    226: Gulf War Illness: Clinical and Research Recommendations and Controversies
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 
     

    Faculty:

    J. Wesson Ashford, MD, PhD, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
    Erin K. Dursa, PhD, MPH, Department of Veteran Affairs, Washington, DC
    Victor F. Kalasinsky, PhD, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC
    Peter D. Rumm, MD, MPH, FACPM, Post-Deployment Health Services, Department of Veteran Affairs, Washington, DC

    Since the 1991 Gulf War, more than 30% of Gulf War veterans have presented to clinicians with a myriad of unexplained symptoms known commonly as Gulf War illness (GWI). This session will introduce this condition, also known as chronic multisymptom illness (CMI), and discuss ongoing differences in opinion on diagnosis and treatment. It will cover the main recommendations from the most recent Institute of Medicine Report: Gulf War and Health: Volume 10: Update of Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War, 2016. It will explain how the VA Research Advisory Committee on GWI, veterans advocacy groups, and internal VA experts have agreed with or proposed alternatives to the IOM recommendations to assure that scientists and clinicians address the most appropriate directions for research and treatment. The session will also present cutting-edge research in this field, research the VA is funding or considering conducting, and how such research might change clinical practice.


     

    227: ACOEM’s Maintenance of Certification, Part IV
    TRACK: Other

    Faculty:

    Clare Bonnema, MLIS, American Board of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL
    Denece Kesler*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

    As one of the four parts required for recertification under Maintenance of Certification, ABPM diplomates are required to complete a practice performance assessment, also known as Part IV. This component utilizes a quality improvement model with opportunities for assessment of practice performance and improvement activities available in clinical practice, teaching, research, and administration. This session will cover ACOEM’s Part IV program.


     

    228: So, You Want to Be an ACOEM Leader?
    TRACK: Other  
     

    Faculty:

    Robert M. Bourgeois*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Bourgeois Medical Clinic, Morgan City, LA
    Barry S. Eisenberg*, CAE, ACOEM, Elk Grove Village, IL
    Stephen A. Frangos*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Chevron Corporation, Houston, TX
    Nelson S. Haas*, MD, MPH, MA, FACOEM, Maine General Workplace Health, Augusta, ME
    Paul J. Papanek*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Cal/OSHA, Long Beach, CA
    Tanisha K. Taylor*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Barnabas Health Corporate Care, Lakewood, NJ

    Experienced ACOEM members will share information on their journey in ACOEM and will share leadership tips that will help participants identify ways for further engagement in ACOEM. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    229: Firearm Injury: Facts, Myths, and What the Science Tells Us
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Garen Wintemute, MD, MPH, University of California, Davis, CA

    Gun violence is a public health issue of grave significance, yet many doctors are misinformed – e.g., “Gag Laws” prohibiting physician-patient discussion of gun issues are largely a myth. Founding director of the University of California, Davis Violence Prevention Research Program, Dr. Garen Wintemute, will discuss what peer-reviewed research shows on firearm injury, including basic epidemiology, preventive strategies, and what evidence exists for interventions such as comprehensive background checks, criteria for denial of access to firearms, etc. The session will distinguish what is based on strong evidence, what is reasonable/educated guessing, and what is unfounded, myth, or just plain wrong. It will explore promising areas for potential policy intervention and how doctors in practice might apply potential interventions in clinical settings. Come learn the facts. 


     

    230: A Guide for the Primary Care Physician in Evaluating Disocyanate Exposed Workers
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    David I. Bernstein, MD, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
    Athena T. Jolly*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, UPMC Susquehanna, Williamsport, PA
    Mark W . Spence, MD, International Isocyanate Institute, Inc., Midland, MI

    Occupational health care providers are often asked to evaluate workers exposed to diisocyanates who are presenting with lower respiratory symptoms at work for respiratory sensitization to diisocyanates. In this scenario, providers need to consider a differential diagnosis that includes non-asthmatic etiologies, aggravation of a pre-existing asthmatic condition, and irritant induced asthma, and which objectively confirms the correct diagnosis using accessible clinical tools. This guide has been developed with the objective of assisting primary care providers, not experienced in the evaluation of occupational lung, to perform an initial evaluation of workers with suspected diisocyanate-related occupational asthma. The guide describes a variety of work-related asthma conditions that must be considered and provides a step-wise approach to the evaluation of work-related asthma. Limitations of this approach will be identified and the importance of an expert assessment by an industrial hygienist presented.


     

    231: Conversion Disorder and Functional Neurological Conditions
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Jonathan Rutchik*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA

    This session will review cases of patients with confusing clinical pictures, as well as identifing clinical pearls, diagnostic algorhythms, and treatment protocols to help practioners in these challenging situations. In addition, industrial causation and disposition will be discussed and neuropsychological assessment will be included in this didactic session.


     

    232: IOMSC: Update and Future Directions
    TRACK: Other  
     

    Faculty:

    Richard Heron*, MD, FRCP, FACOEM, BPplc, London, England
    Ronald R. Loeppke*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAAP, US Preventive Medicine, Inc., Brentwood, TN
    Herman Spanjaard*, MD, Arboconsult, Halfweg, The Netherlands

    The International Occupational Medicine Society Collaborative (IOMSC) is a medical and scientific organization that provides an assembly for representatives of occupational and environmental medicine societies worldwide to: address and collaborate on issues of concern and opportunities; advance the specialty of occupational and environmental medicine; and promote the provision of evidence-based occupational and environmental medicine. The IOMSC has grown from18 countries participating in 2013 to over 30 countries participating today--representing nations in 6 of the 7 continents. At its fourth annual meeting, members of the IOMSC endorsed a Constitution as a framework to move forward. The IOMSC is developing a business plan to foster continued growth of the organization. In addition to an update, this Session will provide an overview of some of the challenges and opportunities we share around the world as well as the potential projects and future directions of the IOMSC.