• April 23 - April 26, 2017

    Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel

    AOHC 2017

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  • AOHC 2017 - April 23-26
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  • AOHC Sessions

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    SUNDAY SESSIONS – APRIL 23  
    Conference Session / Activity   Time Credit Hours
    099: New Member Orientation 7:00 am - 8:00 am 0 CME / MOC
    101: Introduction to OEM 9:00 am - 12:15 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    102: Monitoring Longitudinal  Lung Function Measurements using SPIROLA 9:00 am - 10:30 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    103: Occupational and Personal Risk Factors in Illness and Injury: The NIOSH Compendium Project 9:00 am - 12:15 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    104: Research Laboratory Biohazard Exposure Management 9:00 am - 12:15 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    105: Occupational Spirometry Highlights: Pitfalls and Interpretation 10:45 am - 12:15 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    106: Occupational Dermatoses: What the Occ Doc Needs to Know 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    107: Cutting-edge Sustainability Models for Health Care Employers: Delivering well-being to Patients, Employers and the Community 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    108: Protecting Health Care Workers in Hospitals: PRO PPE Sentinel Surveillance System for Contagious Pathogens 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    109: Cluster Buster: The Approach to Cancer Clusters and the Limitations of Environmental Epidemiology 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    110: Becoming and Maintaining Board Certification in OEM 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    111: Application of Advanced Neuroscience Theories to the Treatment of Workers with Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    112: Using Cutting-edge Informatics Tools to Enhance the Occupational Health Services in Academic Medical Centers 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    113: Pregnant Worker: Current Challenges and Current Concepts 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    114: Journal Club for the Practicing OEM Physician 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm 1.0 CME / MOC
    100: AOHC Opening Session: Induction of New Fellows, C. O. Sappington Lecture, and Awards Presentation   6:00 pm - 7:30 pm      1.0 CME / MOC  

     

    099: New Member Orientation
    TRACK: Other
     

    Are you a potential or new member of ACOEM? Are you a current member who would like to become more involved? Then come to this informal event and network with component, section, and national leaders of the College. Discover ways to get involved and reach the maximum potential of your membership. Continental breakfast will be provided. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    101: Introduction to OEM -- for newcomers to Occ Med Only
    TRACK: Other
     

    Faculty:

    Robert M. Bourgeois*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Bourgeois Medical Clinic, Morgan City, LA
    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA
    Pamela L. Krahl*, MD, MPH, US Navy/Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD
    Douglas Wayne Martin*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, FIAIME, Unity Point Clinic – St. Luke's Occupational Medicine, Sioux City, IA
    Mark A. Roberts*, MD, PhD, FACOEM, Exponent, Inc., Chicago, IL
    Daniel G. Samo*, MD, FACOEM, Northwest Medical Group, Chicago, IL 

    Are you aware of family, urgent care, or internal medicine physicians, nurse practitioners, or physician assistants who are not trained in OEM but are interested in adding some OEM competencies to their “tool kits”? If so, let them know about this great opportunity to learn more about OEM! Are you seeing patients with occupational illnesses or injuries such as musculoskeletal injuries with impairment for joints and the spine or opioid-related issues in the workplace? Are you asked to develop return-to-work plans for your patients? This session will provide a brief introduction on the ways that primary care physicians and other practitioners can benefit from the many resources of OEM. This session is intended for those who are new to the field of occupational medicine. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    102: Monitoring Longitudinal Lung Function Measurements using SPIROLA
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice      

    Faculty:  

    Wesley David Boose*, MD, MPH, US Naval Hospital Guam, Agana Height, GU
    LCDR Cara N. Halldin, PhD, CDC/NIOSH, Morgantown, WV
    Stella E. Hines*, MD, MSPH, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Michael J. Hodgson*, MD, MPH, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Eileen Storey*, MD, MPH, NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV
     

    ACOEM and the American Thoracic Society recommend longitudinal monitoring of pulmonary function tests to detect early signs of excessive lung function decline. Medical surveillance programs that include periodic spirometry can identify workers with excessive lung function decline, providing an opportunity to intervene. Spirometry Longitudinal Data Analysis (SPIROLA) Software is a free tool that can assist with longitudinal spirometry monitoring and detect those at risk for excessive decline. This session will introduce SPIROLA’s capabilities to help monitor longitudinal lung function in individuals and among groups, as well as monitoring test quality. Examples of how to use SPIROLA in research and clinical practices will be presented, as well as how spirometry falls under OSHA’s record keeping and respiratory protection rules. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    103: Occupational and Personal Risk Factors in Illness and Injury: The NIOSH Compendium Project  
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research

    Faculty:

    L. Casey Chosewood, MD, MPH, NIOSH, Atlanta, GA
    Judith Green McKenzie*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACPM, FACOEM, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Michele Kowalski-McGraw*, MD, MPH, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Mountain Top, PA
    Dalia Nessim*, MD, MPH, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center, Tyler, TX
    Sudha P. Pandalai, MD, PhD, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Paul Schulte, PhD, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Natalie V. Schwatka, PhD, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO
    Eric Wood*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of Utah Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Salt Lake City, UT
     

    The compendium of occupational and personal risk factors (ORFs/PRFs) in disease and injury is designed to inform general medical and occupational medicine practitioners, researchers, as well as employers, workers, and other stakeholders that there are many instances where ORFs and PRFs can combine to affect disease or injury. Compendium projects undertaken by NIOSH researchers in collaboration with clinicians, researchers and medical residents at several occupational medicine residency programs in the US and methodological considerations for examining occupational and personal risk factors in the workplace will be discussed. Examples of ORF/PRF outcome interrelationships presented will focus on obesity, physical inactivity, prescription opiate and benzodiazepine use, ethnicity, and exposure biomonitoring and health effect biomarkers for occupational and personal risk factors. Future considerations and ORFs, PRFs, and issues in Total Worker Health® will be discussed. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. 


     

    104: Research Laboratory Biohazard Exposure Management
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Amy Behrman*, MD, FACOEM, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Roger M. Belcourt*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of California, Davis, CA
    T. Warner Hudson*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, UCLA Health System and Campus, Los Angeles, CA
    Robert E. Kosnik, MD, DIH, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    Tom Winters*, MD, FACOEM, Occupational Environmental Health Network, Marlborough, MA

    Research laboratory workers risk exposure to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. These agents are often zoonotic and increasingly involve viral vector constructs with oncogenic as well as infectious disease potential. This case-based session will address exposure prevention, counseling, surveillance, and post-exposure management for a range of laboratory pathogens including Lentivirus vectors, Herpes B virus, Q fever, Brucella, pox viruses, Burkholderia, toxoplasmosis, and Meningococcus. Occupational medicine physician roles in developing and executing treatment protocols, collaborating with researchers and veterinary staff, and participating on institutional biosafety committees will be reviewed. This session was organized by the Medical Center Occupational Health Special Interest Section.


     

    105: Occupational Spirometry Highlights: Pitfalls and Interpretation
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice

    Faculty:

    Mary C. Townsend*, DrPH, MC Townsend Associates, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA

    Occupational spirometry is often performed to comply with federal regulations and industry requirements. However, the technical quality of such testing is often mediocre, producing inaccurate results and leading to incorrect inferences about worker health. To increase practitioners’ awareness of the impact of spirometry’s many aspects, this session draws on requirements and best practice guidelines for occupational testing. Recent regulatory requirements for spirometry in miners and in silica-exposed workers will be reviewed. Major spirometer issues, requirements for valid tests, volume-time and flow-volume curves and what they tell the technician and the practitioner, and interpretation of test results will also be covered. Testing errors will be demonstrated. Session participants are encouraged to print out OSHA 3637-03 2013: Spirometry Testing in Occupational Health Programs: Best Practices for Healthcare Professionals from www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3637.pdf.  


     

    106: Occupational Dermatoses: What the Occ Doc Needs to Know
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Heather P. Lampel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAAD, Cary Dermatology, Cary, NC 

    Workers in many occupations are at risk for development of work-related or work-exacerbated skin conditions. Identification and appropriate management of occupational dermatoses, including but not limited to allergic and contact dermatitis, are important to reduce lost work time and to correctly identify workers who may need restrictions, job reassignment, and/or vocational rehabilitation. A case-based approach will be used to discuss the epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, and initial management of common occupational skin conditions, including irritant, allergic, and contact dermatitis. The session will also include a discussion about indications for referral to dermatology specialists for specific skin conditions. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.

     
     

    107: Cutting-edge Sustainability Models for Health Care Employers: Delivering well-being to Patients, Employers and the Community
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management  
     

    Faculty:

    Ismail Nabeel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mount Sinai Health Systems, New York, NY
    Emily Senay*, MD, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

    Many hospitals and academic medical centers have addressed the issue of environmental sustainability through the “greening” paradigm. Under this paradigm, hospitals seek to become green or “less bad” by recycling more, reducing energy, and supporting employee and patient wellness programs that reduce environmental footprints. These efforts either stand alone or run alongside operations or the executive suite. In contrast, over the past decades many businesses and corporations have not only been able to reduce their carbon footprint, but are now aspiring to do “more good” (increase human well-being). This concept is known as NET positive. This session will discuss cutting-edge sustainability concepts and make the case for a new health care business paradigm where hospitals embrace NET positivity and become leaders in delivering well-being to patients, employees, and community members.

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    108: Protecting Health Care Workers in Hospitals: PRO PPE Sentinel Surveillance System for Contagious Pathogens
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Muktar Aliyu*, MD, DrPH, FACOEM, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
    Melanie Swift*, MD, FACOEM, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
    Mary Yarbrough*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

    In the event of a pandemic, a new highly contagious pathogen, or bioterrorism, health care worker (HCW) safety relies largely on the effective use of personal protective equipment (PPE). During the H1N1 influenza and Ebola outbreaks, hospitals experienced supply and training challenges related to implementing new CDC recommendations for PPE. The federal agencies who develop new recommendations are not privy to PPE inventory management systems in hospitals, and the strategic national stockpile cannot predict local demands without data on PPE makes and models for which HCW have been trained. Within a facility, stakeholders such as supply chain, occupational health, and emergency preparedness often operate independently. Nationally, there is a lack of clarity regarding US preparedness to protect HCWs while caring for large numbers of highly infectious patients in hospitals. This session will describe the development of a national surveillance system to monitor PPE supply and effective use in hospitals in collaboration with CDC-NIOSH. This session was organized by the Medical Center Occupational Health Special Interest Section.


     

    109: Cluster Buster: The Approach to Cancer Clusters and the Limitations of Environmental Epidemiology
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Coleen P. Baird*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, US Army Public Health Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD

    Cancer is common and rates vary by type, and the age/sex of the population of interest and their habits, environments, and genetics. Because of or in spite of this, it is not common for a group to perceive that a cancer (or cancers) is occurring too frequently among their ranks. Cancer-cluster evaluations are frequently requested of state or local public health departments and may be requested based on the perceptions of a concerned community or workplace. This session starts with an overview of cancers of interest to the military and potentially associated with military service. Cancer clusters will be discussed with an overview of several clusters evaluated by the US Army Public Health Center. The steps in these assessments will be discussed and some lessons learned or points to consider will be presented. The limitations and challenges of epidemiological approaches to environmental exposures and cancers will be discussed. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.


     

    110: Becoming and Maintaining Board Certification in OEM
    TRACK: Other 

    Faculty:

    Clare Bonnema, MLIS, American Board of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL
    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA

    Members of the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will discuss specifics regarding the rules for acceptance as a candidate to sit for the initial certification examination, as well as for the four parts required for recertification under maintenance of certification: 1) professionalism; 2) lifelong learning; 3) cognitive examination; and 4) practice performance. Extensive Q&A with attendees has been a hallmark of this session. Additional information is available on the ABPM web site at www.theabpm.org. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    111: Application of Advanced Neuroscience Theories to the Treatment of Workers with Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
     

    Faculty:

    Russell Gelfman*, MD, MS, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

    The number of Americans affected by chronic pain exceeds the number affected by diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. It is one of the most common reasons for seeking health care, is a leading cause of short-term disability, and is the most common cause of long-term disability. It represents a significant portion of the 20% of injured workers who contribute to 80% of the costs involved in workers’ compensation. Despite these statistics, the average physician is often poorly informed about current neuroscience theories of pain and the benefits and risks of various treatment options for pain. As a result, acute and chronic pain is often inadequately treated. This presentation will review current theories of pain on the continuum from acute to chronic and review treatment options in light of this knowledge to improve the care of injured workers who experience disabling musculoskeletal pain.


     
    112: Using Cutting-edge Informatics Tools to Enhance the Occupational Health Services in Academic Medical Centers
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM


    Faculty:

    Amir Mohammad*, MD, FACOEM, VA Connecticut VHA/Yale School of Medicine, Orange, CT
    Ismail Nabeel*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mount Sinai Health Systems, New York, NY

    This session will review the different electronic medical record (EMR) and surveillance database Infrastructure currently used in two separate academic medical centers (Veterans Health Administration and Mount Sinai School of Medicine). The session will provide a better understanding of how to incorporate fundamental of informatics principles for an effective usage of EMR (connectivity, usability, care delivery, big data) within the occupational medicine setting. Newer tools demonstrating pattern recognition based on informatics and analytical tools to help with clinical or population study focused intervention within the field of occupational medicine. Review and analysis of data warehouse to support occupational health services. Introduction of NIOSH-funded research pilot project, Using Informatics principles to enhance occupational medicine understanding among primary care physicians. Use of smart FHIR, SNOMED, and wearable technologies to enhance occupational health services.

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    113: Pregnant Worker: Current Challenges and Current Concepts
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Joseph Leonce Charlot*, MD, MPH, MRO, CIME, RWJ Barnabas Health Corporate Care, Clara Maass Medical Center, Belleville, NJ

    The proper occupational medicine management of the pregnant worker is important to promote a safe pregnancy and a healthy child. Attending this session will provided you clinical tips to help you handle the current challenges of the pregnant worker. You will become familiar with resources and concepts to make you an effective occupational medicine provider to the pregnant worker population.


     

    114: Journal Club for the Practicing OEM Physician
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Ronda B. McCarthy*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, City of Waco Employee Health Services, Concentra, Waco, TX
    Judith Green McKenzie*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACPM, FACOEM, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

    This session will use a journal club format to allow physicians an opportunity to refresh their ability to critically appraise scientific evidence and discuss with their peers how it translates into professional practice. The session will provide a forum for practicing physicians to participate in a guided critical appraisal of the scientific literature. After a brief overview, attendees will be guided through the structured steps by experienced faculty using a round-table discussion format. A current high impact article will be reviewed. The salient elements to be examined are study hypothesis, study design, selection of the study population, data collection methods, statistical analysis, the role of chance, bias and confounding on internal validity, external validity, and context. Both article and template will be provided prior to the conference. This session was organized by the History and Archives Special Interest Section. 

     
     
    100: Session 100: AOHC Opening Session: Induction of New Fellow, C. O. Sappington Lecture, and Awards Presentation 
    TRACK: Other 


    Sappington Lecturer:

    Ronald R. Loeppke*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAAP, US Preventive Medicine, Inc., Brentwood, TN.

    The opening session of the 101st annual meeting of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine will feature the induction of new Fellows and the C.O. Sappington Memorial Lecture. Named for Clarence Olds Sappington, MD, DrPH (1889-1949), a noted consultant in occupational diseases and industrial hygiene, this lecture is presented annually at AOHC to serves as a forum to address major issues in occupational and environmental medicine. This year’s Sappington lecturer is Ronald R. Loeppke*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAAP, US Preventive Medicine, Inc., Brentwood, TN.