• April 23 - April 26, 2017

    Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel

    AOHC 2017

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  • AOHC 2017 - April 23-26
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  • AOHC Sessions

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    TUESDAY SESSIONS – APRIL 25   
    Conference Session / Activity   Time Credit Hours
    801: Denver Fire Academy Worksite Visit 7:45 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    301: The Ludlow Massacre and Beyond: Occupational Medicine and Corporate Welfare in Early 20th Century Colorado 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    302: Drilling Down: US Oil and Gas Extraction Worker Safety and Health Trends and Current Issues 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    303: Hazardous Drug Workplace Safety and Compliance 8:30 am - 10:00 am 1.5 CME / MOC
    304: Commercial Driver Medical Examinations: Where They Are, Where They Are Going 8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    305: Lead and Beyond: The Global Impact of Regulations, Trade and Company Practice on Population Lead Exposure: A Chance for OEM Collaboration 8:30 am - 12:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    306: Unlearning Self-defeating Thinking Habits: A Proactive Approach 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    307: ACOEM Court: You Be the Judge! 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    308: Hazardous Drug Exposure and Medical Surveillance 10:30 am - 12:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    309: Current Issues Affecting the Health and Safety of Underserved Occupational Populations in the US and Abroad 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    310: Interaction of Healthcare Worker Health and Safety on Patient Health and Safety 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    311: Evidence-based Workers’ Compensation (WC) Management  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    312: Public Safety Medicine Update 2017: The Cutting Edge 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    313: Inhalational Hazards and Respiratory Health Effects from Post 9/11 Deployment to Southwest Asia 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm 3.0 CME / MOC
    314: Migration and Work: Underserved Populations in the Americas and the USA 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    315: Communicating Effectively with Non-occupational Health Colleagues on Differing Opinions in Managing Fitness-for-Duty and Return-to-Work 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC
    316: Partnering with Workers’ Compensation Insurers to Reach Small Enterprises in Need of Health Promotion and Health Protection 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 1.5 CME / MOC  
    317: Neurological Fitness-for-Duty 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    318: Mitigating the Health Risks of Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Workplace Hazards in Oil and Gas Production 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    319: Patient Satisfaction Measurement in OEM 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    320: US Military OEM Update 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    321: Is There a Doctor on Board? Preparing for Airline Medical Events and Emergencies 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm 1 CME / MOC  

     

    801: Denver Fire Academy Worksite Visit
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice


    Faculty:

    Fabrice Czarnecki*, MD, MA, MPH, FACOEM, Transportation Security Administration, Arlington, VA
    Alisa M. Koval*, MD, MPH, MHSA, Denver Health/COSH, Denver, CO

    Participants will experience components of the most widely used pre-placement functional evaluation, the Candidate Physical Abilities Test, and will have the opportunity to climb stairs, drag hoses, carry equipment, force entry, raise ladders, drag dummies, breach ceilings, and experience what firefighters should be able to do as part of their academy training. The tour of the training facilities will allow participants to learn more about the demands of a firefighting occupation and have an opportunity to discuss with expert trainers the policies, practices, and procedures used to safely train effective firefighters, including NFPA 1582. This worksite visit was coordinated by the Public Safety Medicine Special Interest Section. Attendees must wear long pants; loose, comfortable, breathable clothing for under fire gear; and closed-toed athletic shoes (gyms shoes acceptable). Advanced registration is required; additional non-refundable fee applies. This is a non-refundable, non-transferable activity.

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    301: The Ludlow Massacre and Beyond: Occupational Medicine and Corporate Welfare in Early 20th Century Colorado
    TRACK: Other
     

    Faculty:

    Victoria Miller, Steelworks Center for the American West, Pueblo, CO
    Fawn-Amber Montoya, MD, Colorado State University, Pueblo, CO
    Jonathan Rees, MD, Colorado State University, Pueblo, CO

    This session will summarize and discuss the implications for occupational medicine of the Ludlow Massacre, the culmination of the great Colorado Coalfield War of 1913-1914. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., the primary owner of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, used this dispute as a reason to increase many aspects of that firm’s corporate welfare program including its pioneering medical programs. The ramifications of those actions echo through the American industrial landscape down to this day. 


     

    302: Drilling Down: US Oil and Gas Extraction Worker Safety and Health Trends and Current Issues
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research 
     

    Faculty:

    Robert Harrison*, MD, MPH, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    Bradley S. King, PhD, MPH, CIH, CDC/NIOSH, Denver, CO
    Kyla Retzer, MPH, CDC/NIOSH, Denver, CO
    Sadie Sanchez*, MD, MPH, Center for Occupational Safety and Health at Denver Health, Denver, CO

    The on-shore oil and gas extraction (OGE) industry recently experienced a boom period with the workforce doubling 2004-2014. Despite a downward trend in the OGE worker fatality rate during this time, the fatality rate remained seven times higher than in the general industry and was also elevated when compared to similar industries (construction, transportation). This session will provide an overview of the epidemiology of OGE worker fatalities and injuries and will review current knowledge of occupational exposures in the industry. Faculty will discuss a series of worker deaths (n = 10) specifically related to hydrocarbon gas and vapor exposures and low oxygen concentration environments, a hazard not previously documented in the oilfield. Signs and symptoms of exposure to hydrocarbons will be reviewed as well as how occupational health providers and other professionals can play a role in improving health and safety for the oil and gas workforce.


     

    303: Hazardous Drug Workplace Safety and Compliance
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management      

    Faculty:  

    Thomas H. Connor, PhD, NIOSH, Cincinnati, OH
    Michael J. Hodgson*, MD, MPH, OSHA, Washington, DC
    Elizabeth Mease*, MD, MBA, FACOEM, Louis Strokes Cleveland VA Medical Clinic, Cleveland, OH
    Vaiyapuri Subramaniam, PharmD, MS, FCP, FASHP, FASCP, Veterans Health Administration, Silver Spring, MD

    This session will review challenges and opportunities in the implementation of an effective hazardous drug safety program in a large hospital network system. A NIOSH scientist, a pharmacist, an industrial hygienist, and a physician from the VHA will provide updates on the following topics: scientific information; requirement of <USP 800>; updates in safe handling guidance (OSHA, NIOSH, ACHP, ONS); appropriate engineering controls; PPE requirements; compounding and administration issues; disposal requirements; wipe sampling issues; development of an alternative duty fertility protection policy; and implementation of a hospital hazardous drug committee.


     

    304: Commercial Driver Medical Examinations: Where They Are, Where They Are Going 
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 

    Faculty:

    Natalie P. Hartenbaum*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, OccuMedix, Dresher, PA
    Kurt Hegmann*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    Charles A. Horan III, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Washington, DC
    Christine A. Hydock, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Washington, DC
    Matthew S. Thiese*, PhD, MSPH, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    This session will provide an update on the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners and other issues that affect the commercial driver medical examiner. Recent research on medical issues and commercial drivers will be reviewed. A panel will provide an opportunity for attendees to question experienced examiners and a representative from FMCSA on issues important to the commercial driver medical examiner. Questions to be addressed by the panel can be submitted to CDME16@gmail.com at least 48 hours prior to the session. This session was organized by the Transportation Special Interest Section.  


     

    305: Lead and Beyond: The Global Impact of Regulations, Trade and Company Practice on Population Lead Exposure: A Chance for OEM Collaboration
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management  
     

    Faculty:

    Perry Gottesfeld, MPH, Occupational Knowledge International, San Francisco, CA
    Michael J. Kosnett, MD, MPH, Colorado School of Public Health, Denver, CO
    Gerald Manley, RSR Corporation, Dallas, TX
    Paul J. Papanek*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Cal/OSHA, Long Beach, CA
    Jean Xiao*, MD, MSc, MS, FACOEM, Waterfront Medical Services, PC, New York, NY

    This session will showcase the impacts of environmental and workplace rule making, trade policy, and employer policies on the health of populations exposed to lead in the US and abroad. The session will demonstrate the strong ties that exist between developed and developing countries in terms of trade and regulation and the effect on the burden of disease due to lead poisoning. Additionally, the session will explore possible areas of collaboration between ACOEM and IOMSC in lowering global exposures to lead. Topics of discussion will include specific examples of regulatory policy that are likely to impact worldwide lead exposures: the role of US and Canadian regulations in exporting hazardous industries; economic impact of global lead poisoning; global initiatives to ban lead paint, gasoline and other products; potential global impacts of updating the OSHA lead standard; and impacts of lead manufacturing and recycling in China. This session was organized by the International Special Interest Section.


     

    306: Unlearning Self-defeating Thinking Habits: A Proactive Approach
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM

    Faculty:

    David Frances*, PhD, Quadrant Health Strategies, Inc., Beverly, MA

    OEM promotes good nutrition, regular exercise, and healthful habits to prevent illness and injury. But OEM practitioners have lacked the tools to actively address one major contributor to health and productivity problems: common mental health disorders, estimated to cost American business at least $225 billion/year. This session will present research-based concepts to address these problems in the workplace and introduce evidence-based techniques for self-improvement and demonstrate a stigma-free training program by which to educate receptive corporate audiences. This session will review benefits and shortcomings of traditional efforts to address mental health issues in the corporate environment; present 50 years of research supporting the concept of cognitive health; describe how irrational, self-defeating thinking habits can be identified and unlearned; and demonstrate a lunch-and-learn program on cognitive health that has been piloted successfully at two global companies.

     
     

    307: ACOEM Court: You Be the Judge!
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Laurence John Free, Esq., Keating, Wagner, Polidori & Free, Denver, CO
    Alisa M. Koval, MD, MPH, MHSA, Denver Health/COSH, Denver, CO
    Paul Krueger, JD, Ritsema & Lyon, PC, Denver, CO
    Michael J. Levine*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Occupational Medical Consultant, Williamsburg, VA
    Francesca K. Litow*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Norfolk Southern Corporation, Norfolk, VA
    X. J. Ethan Moses*, MD, MPH, Peak Form Medical Clinic, Brighton, CO
    Sadie Sanchez*, MD, MPH, Center for Occupational Safety and Health at Denver Health, Denver, CO

    This session will present workers’ compensation cases based on case files (or presenting facts that mimic what has occurred in files, adjusted to maximize educational value), wherein faculty will portray the roles of claimant’s attorney, a defense attorney and physical defending/explaining the position taken with regard to restrictions, maximum medical improvement, accommodations in the workplace, or other issues impacting fitness to return to work. Participants will be engaged and will “vote” as to their “ruling” on each case, based upon the information presented. The faculty will then present and discuss the actual court decision(s) pertinent to each case. Although cases will be drawn from Colorado case files, the information presented will be based upon principles common to workers’ compensation law in general and not limited to Colorado.

     
     

    308: Hazardous Drug Exposure and Medical Surveillance
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Melissa McDiarmid*, MD, MPH, DABT, FACOEM, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Richard D. Newcomb*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Mark Russi*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Yale University, Yale New Haven Health System, New Haven, CT
    Melanie Swift*, MD, FACOEM, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
    Marcelo Targino*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FACP, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ

    Hazardous drug handling entails well recognized and common occupational exposure risks for health care and pharmaceutical personnel in a range of workplaces. Environmental controls may not fully mitigate exposure risk, particularly in health care settings, and medical surveillance for hazardous drug handlers is recommended in national guidelines. However, the specificity and clinical value of surveillance tests are controversial. The session will include evidence for current recommendations, analysis of risks and value for specific tests, evaluation of current surveillance practices in health care and pharmaceutical populations, and operational challenges in medical surveillance. This session was organize by the Medical Center Occupational Health Special Interest Section, in conjunction with the Physicians in the Pharmaceutical Industry Special Interest Section.

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    309: Current Issues Affecting the Health and Safety of Underserved Occupational Populations in the US and Abroad
    TRACK: Other  
     

    Faculty:

    Bruce Goldstein, JD, Farmworker Justice, Washington, DC
    Scott Morris*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Valley Medical Center of the University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    Michael O'Malley*, MD, University of California, California Department of Pesticide Regulations, Davis, CA
    Rafael Y. Lefkowitz*, MD, MPH, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
    Molly Tran*, MD, MPH, MA, FACOEM, State University of New York-Downstate School of Public Health, Brookly, NY

    This session will explore current issues affecting the health and safety of different underserved occupational populations in the US and abroad. It will also review some of the relevant legal and regulatory changes faced by this marginalized group of workers. Additional populations will include those caught up in human trafficking and bicycle transportation workers. Clinical, toxicological, regulatory, and legislative issues involving pesticide monitoring and skin cancer will also be addressed. This session was organized by the Underserved Occupational Populations Special Interest Section. 


     

    310: Interaction of Healthcare Worker Health and Safety on Patient Health and Safety
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM 
     

    Faculty:

     
    Todd Hohn, CSP, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, CA
    T. Warner Hudson*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, UCLA Health System and Campus, Los Angeles, CA
    E. Andrew Kapp, PhD, CSP, CHMM*, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., Northbrook, IL
    Ronald R. Loeppke*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, FAAP, US Preventive Medicine, Inc., Brentwood, TN
    Robert K. McLellan*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, N

    There is growing agreement that the health and safety of patients is inextricably linked to the health and safety of health care workers. Therefore, healthc are employers need to put a new emphasis on ensuring the health and safety of their own workers. It requires striving to achieve greater parity of resources, alignment of workplace incentives, institutional commitment, and a new focus on accountability for healthy and safe employee environments beginning with senior leadership. ACOEM and Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., convened a summit to identify recommendations for both how best to integrate worker and patient health and safety programs and how to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This session will review these recommendations and provide examples from hospital and health care systems to demonstrate how some employers are beginning to construct models that promote this new vision for health care worker safety and wellness. This session was organized by the Health and Productivity Special Interest Section.  


     

    311: Evidence-based Workers’ Compensation (WC) Management
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM 

    Faculty:

    Edward J. Bernacki*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Dell Medical School, Austin, TX
    Heather Holt Kraus, Esq., Semmes, Bowen & Semmes, Baltimore, MD
    Nimisha Kalia-Satwah*, MD, MPH, MBA, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
    Robert Alan Lavin, MD, MS, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Xuguang (Grant) Tao*, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Larry Yuspeh, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

    This session will address recent trends in WC injuries and WC cost; development of predictive models for WC cost using epidemiological/bio-statistic tools; impact of opioid, benzodiazepines, sedatives, and antidepressants on WC cost; early use and discontinuation of opioids may be associated with better outcomes; and beneficial impact of occupational clinics on injuries and WC cost. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    312: Public Safety Medicine Update 2017: The Cutting Edge
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 
     

    Faculty:

    Ralph Stanbery Bovard*, MD, MPH, FACSM, HealthPartners Medical Group, St. Paul, MN
    Fabrice Czarnecki*, MD, MA, MPH, FACOEM, Transportation Security Administration, Arlington, VA
    Stefanos N. Kales*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACOEM, Harvard University, Cambridge Health Alliance, Boston, MA
    Michael J. Levine*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Occupational Medical Consultant, Williamsburg, VA
    Patrick McKenna, DO, MPH, US Navy, Norfolk, VA
    Richard J. Miller*, MD, Peachtree Corners, GA
    Daniel G. Samo*, MD, FACOEM, Northwest Medical Group, Chicago, IL

    This session is designed to present the most up-to-date medical guidance, controversies, and central issues surrounding the evaluation and care of firefighters, law enforcement officers (LEOs), and emergency medical service workers. There will be an overview of updates to ACOEM’s Guidance for the Medical Evaluation of Law Enforcement Officers. Specific clinical cases of how the Guidance has been used for evaluation of LEOs with various medical conditions including spine conditions, hip injuries, and psychiatric issues will be presented. There will be a discussion of the extensive updates to NFPA 1582 and how to use the document to evaluate firefighters with conditions such as cardiac enlargement and heat stress. There will also be time for a presentation on any late-breaking topics, as well as a question and answer session for discussions with leading public safety medicine practitioners. This session was organized by the Public Safety Medicine Special Interest Section.


     
    313: Inhalational Hazards and Respiratory Health Effects from Post 9/11 Deployment to Southwest Asia
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice


    Faculty:

    Drew A. Helmer, MD, MS, War Related Illness and Injury Study Center, VA-NJHCS, East Orange, NJ
    Silpa Dhoma Krefft*, MD, MPH, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO
    Geoffrey S. Plumlee, PhD, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA
    Cecile S. Rose*, MD, MPH, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO
    Ronald F. Teichman*, MD, MPH, FACP, FACOEM, Teichman Occ. Health Associates Inc., Orange, NJ

    This session will provide an overview of inhalational hazards (desert dust particulate matter, burn pit emissions, fuel combustion products) that military personnel and civilian contractors frequently encounter during post-9/11 deployment to Iraq, Afghanistan, and other regions in southwest Asia. This session also will feature discussions of epidemiology and clinical manifestations of the emerging spectrum of post-9/11 deployment-related respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchiolitis. Clinicians and researchers from the military and civilian sectors will present updates from the ongoing VA Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry, current prevention efforts, disease detection and management recommendations, and future research needs.

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    314: Migration and Work: Underserved Populations in the Americas and the USA
    TRACK: Other  
     

    Faculty:

    Linda Forst*, MD, MS, MPH, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL
    Matthew C. Keifer*, MD, MPH, Veterans Health Administration, Seattle, WA
    Jorge A. Morales*, MD, MS, PhD, FACOEM, Proctor & Gamble Latin America, Mexico City, Mexico

    This session will address the special health and safety issues experienced by immigrant US workers in the construction and health care industries. It will present the population demographics, health and safety hazards, and examples of prevention programs targeted to these groups. Recommendations for addressing acute and chronic occupational illnesses and injuries in these underserved occupational populations will be presented. This session was organized by the Underserved Occupational Populations Special Interest Section, in conjunction with the International Special Interest Section.  


     

    315: Communicating Effectively with Non-occupational Health Colleagues on Differing Opinions in Managing Fitness-for-Duty and Return-to-Work 
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Philip Adamo*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Baystate Health, Springfield, MA
    Gladys L. Fernandez, MD, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA
    Michael J. Levine*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Occupational Medical Consultant, Williamsburg, VA

    Simulation-based education has become a part of health care training, assessment of performance, and team-based competency evaluations nationally and internationally. The role of simulation for teaching and assessing knowledge, skills, and behaviors has been described and effectively implemented across undergraduate and graduate academic centers for more than a decade. The body of evidence supporting this as an adjunct for educating and evaluating new skills, assessing retention of skills, and maintenance of proficiency is increasing and this is the basis for much of the ongoing training. Simulation can be a supportive adjunct to the assessment of effectiveness and identification of needs and challenges as well as training and remediation of skills related to challenging interpersonal communications, conflict resolution, and team-based approaches to patient care. This session will include role play scenarios for audience engagement. This session was organized by the OEM Practice Council.


     

    316: Partnering with Workers’ Compensation Insurers to Reach Small Enterprises in Need of Health Promotion and Health Protection
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Karen Curran, Pinnacol Assurance, Denver, CO
    Lee S. Newman*, MD, FACOEM, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Denver, CO
    Natalie Schwatka, PhD, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO
    Erin Shore, MPH, Center for Health, Work & Environment, Colorado School of Public Health, Denver, CO

    The literature supplies evidence on the impact of employee health on productivity and traditional health care costs, but does it also impact workers’ compensation costs and claims? Additionally, health promotion programs may succeed in mid- to large-size companies, but what can be done to reach the small enterprises where the majority of Americans work? This session will examine the nexus of workers’ compensation, health promotion, and small businesses by presenting three studies that illustrate innovative approaches. Topics will include the impetuous for promoting worker well-being from the perspective of Pinnacol Assurance, Colorado’s major workers’ compensation carrier and the interaction between work organization, workers’ personal health, and workers’ compensation claims and costs. Data from a successful dissemination program for small businesses that applies Total Worker Health® principles “scaled” to improve adoption and success will be discussed.


     

    317: Neurological Fitness-for-Duty
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Jonathan Rutchik*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA

    This session will cover recent and timely cases of police officers, firefighters, commercial drivers, aviation, and other safety-sensitive individuals who have neurological diagnoses. Such diagnoses include head injuries, headaches, seizures, strokes, mental incapacitation, limb pain, tremors, and neurodegenerative disorders. Discussion will inlcude the various recommendations and regulations in order for practitioners to assist employers in the return-to-work process while considering the American Disabilities Act. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates.


     

    318: Mitigating the Health Risks of Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Workplace Hazards in Oil and Gas Production
    TRACK: Environmental Health and Risk Management  
     

    Faculty:

    Michael S. McKee, PE, Caerus Oil and Gas, LLC, Denver, CO

    Workplaces hazards abound in the exploration for and production of oil and gas. These hazards can range from pressurized lines and equipment to explosions and fires to exposure of hazardous vapors such as hydrogen sulfide. This session will present an overview with a specific discussion of current best practices regarding the mitigation of exposure to hydrogen sulfide, a particularly dangerous substance that can be present in oil and gas work. Specific case reports will highlight best practices to mitigate workplace hazards, with emphasis on the mitigation of hydrogen sulfide in the corporation's operation on the western slope of Colorado. The speaker is the environmental, health and safety manager for a private oil and gas production corporation in Denver.


     

    319: Patient Satisfaction Measurement in OEM  
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Douglas Wayne Martin*, MD, FACOEM, FAAFP, FIAIME, Unity Point Clinic – St. Luke’s Occupational Medicine, Sioux City, IA
    Glenn Pransky*, MD, MOccH, FACOEM, Liberty Mutual Research Institute, Hopkinton, MA
    Matthew S. Thiese*, PhD, MSPH, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Patient satisfaction measures are increasingly used to evaluate and improve quality in all types of medical practices. With these tools, it is important that they be appropriately designed for the practice and adequately tested to ensure that they reflect and promote quality care and do not create financial incentives that may lead to lower quality or excessive medical care. The unique aspects of OEM practice require development of OEM-specific measures and thoughtful interpretation of results. Several unique features of OEM practice (work status as a primary outcome, potential conflicts between employer and patient interests, medico-legal context of work injuries; performance of regulatory examinations, and others) create OEM-specific concerns which imply a need for an OEM-specific approach to patient satisfaction assessment. This session will review the background, development, and current status of the ACOEM Patient Satisfaction Survey Tool. This session was organized by the Private Practice in Occupational Medicine Special Interest Section.


     

    320: US Military OEM Update
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Col Jon R. Jacobson, DO, MPH, US Air Force, Falls Church, VA
    Pamela L. Krahl*, MD, MPH, US Navy/Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD
    William A. Rice*, Army Public Health Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    This session is led by the specialty leaders and consultants for OEM from each of the US military services and is intended to familiarize learners with the occupational health programs of each of the services, highlighting the similarities and differences in major governing regulations. Greater understanding of these similarities and differences can benefit OEM practice on joint installations, provide insight into some of the challenges of integrating programs on joint bases, and offer suggestions of possible areas for research to address gaps in knowledge of current program status. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.


     

    321: Is There a Doctor on Board? Preparing for Airline Medical Events and Emergencies
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Faculty:

    Robert Orford*, MD, CM, MS, MPH, FACP, FACOEM, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ

    There were 3.5 billion airline passengers in 2015, with 3-6 reported medical events and emergencies per 1,000 passengers daily. Physicians or other medically trained personnel on board are frequently asked to assist when a medical event occurs, but often have little knowledge of what resources are available to them, and what they should do. Aircrafts carry first-aid kits and expanded medical kits in addition to automated external defibrillators. Ground-based medical support from the airline medical department or from a contracted in-flight emergency medical service is also normally readily available. In addition to providing assistance for passengers in-flight, occupational health professionals should be prepared to offer preventive advice to traveling employees and patients. The Aerospace Medical Association’s Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel will be discussed. Practical advice on how to prepare for and respond to medical events on board an aircraft will be provided.