• April 23 - April 26, 2017

    Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel

    AOHC 2017

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  • AOHC 2017 - April 23-26
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  • AOHC Sessions

      Pre/Post Conference Courses |  Sunday Sessions |  Monday Sessions |  Tuesday Sessions |  Wednesday Sessions  

    WEDNESDAY SESSIONS – APRIL 26   
    Conference Session / Activity   Time Credit Hours
    401: Preventing Musculoskeletal Disorders: Screening and Workplace Interventions 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    402: The Role of the Occupational Health Provider in Active Shooter and Bomber Situations 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    403: Getting Your Start in Research 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    404: Better WC Care through Better Documentation and Coding Requirements 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    405: Carbon Monoxide Neurotoxicity 7:00 am - 8:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    400: Annual Membership Meeting  8:00 am - 10:00 am 1 CME / MOC
    406: Exposure, Metabolomics and Biomarkers, and Health Outcomes: Part I 10:15 am - 11:15 pm 1 CME / MOC
    407: Diagnostic and Interventional Treatments for Upper Extremity Injuries Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound for OEM Physicians 10:15 am - 12:30 pm 2.0 CME / MOC
    408: Review and Update of 15 Years of the World Trade Center Health Program 10:15 am - 12:30 pm 2.0 CME / MOC
    409: Providing a Warm Hand-off: Connecting Safety-net Primary Care Providers with Occupational Health Consultation 10:15 am - 12:30 pm 2.0 CME / MOC
    411: Medical Marijuana  10:15 am - 12:30 pm 2.0 CME / MOC
    410: Exposure, Metabolomics and Biomarkers, and Health Outcomes, Part II 11:30 am - 12:30 pm      1 CME / MOC

     

    401: Preventing Musculoskeletal Disorders: Screening and Workplace Interventions
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice
      

    Faculty:

    Ibraheem (Abe) Al-Tarawneh, PhD, Ohio Center for Occupational Safety and Health, Pickerington, OH
    Bradley A. Evanoff*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
    David Rempel*, MD, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA

    Post-offer pre-placement (POPP) testing for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), low back pain (LBP), and other musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is used to prevent workplace injuries. Under this practice, workers with abnormal nerve conduction, radiographs, or other findings are not hired into physically demanding jobs. This presentation will review current evidence on the utility of POPP screening for CTS and LBP. The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation recently expanded the financial resources and reach of its occupational safety and health programs. The impact has been a reduction of injuries by 13.2%. This session will present some of these programs with case studies exploring their impact. The Safety Intervention Grants Program provides matching funds to businesses for engineering controls to prevent MSDs. Participating businesses reduced the frequency and cost of injuries by 66% and 81%, respectively. This model program has components that should be useful to any size company.


     

    402: The Role of the Occupational Health Provider in Active Shooter and Bomber Situations
    TRACK: Management and Administration in OEM 
     

    Faculty:

    Matthew Minson*, MD, Superior Energy Services/Texas A&M University, Houston, TX

    Recent events in the US and abroad have brought greater attention to the health and medical response considerations for an active shooter or bomb-related incident. Understandably, the majority of emphasis has been focused on emergency service and public safety preparedness and response with an emphasis on integration and preparations. An area of medical practice that may and certainly will play a critical role is occupational health. Such an exploration and discussion, is the purpose of this presentation. Items discussed include top clinical issues associated with mass shooting and bombing issues as per the National Academies of Medicine position paper; medical information sharing with EMS and health care systems (FEMA IS 907) and how regulatory and legal applications (PREP Act, Countermeasures Dispensing, and disaster declarations); direct care considerations, credentialing recommendations; proprietary and civil liability issues; and behavioral health and surveillance.


     

    403: Getting Your Start in Research
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research      

    Faculty:  

    Pamela L. Krahl*, MD, MPH, US Navy/Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD
    Timothy M. Mallon*, MD, MS, MPH, FACOEM, US Navy/Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD

    Contributing to the medical literature is critical to keep our specialty vibrant with sharing of ideas and advances, yet often, getting started in research can seem like an overwhelming undertaking. Demystify research by learning from three seasoned researchers who will share their experiences and give practical advice on how you can get your start. This session was organized by the Academic Occupational Medicine Special Interest Section. This session may be of particular interest to residents and recent graduates. 


     

    404: Better WC Care through Better Documentation and Coding Requirements 
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice

    Faculty:

    Marianne Cloeren*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Managed Care Advisors, Baltimore, MD

    The documentation requirements for workers’ compensation care follow rules designed for a different purpose. Clinicians providing and documenting care consistent with evidence-based practice standards are usually not rewarded for this because the coding system does not recognize the different cognitive work needed for good care in workers’ compensation. ACOEM is trying to change this with the publication of a position paper on Defining Documentation Requirements for Coding Quality Care in Workers’ Compensation, and multiple support documents for putting these recommendations into practice. This multi-year effort has gained the interest and support of many industry experts. This session will review the status of this effort, share tools for implementation, and address how ACOEM members can champion this initiative. This session was organized by the Work Fitness and Disability Special Interest Section, in conjunction with the OEM Practice Council.


     

    405: Carbon Monoxide Neurotoxicity
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Jeffrey Brent, MD, PhD, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, CO
    Jonathan Rutchik*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    David Schretlen, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

    This session will introduce clinical vignettes of carbon monoxide exposures and will present the state of art for this evaluation, including history, physical examination findings, exposure assessment, and neuropsychological testing. The discussion will include the delayed neurological and neuropsychological syndrome, as well as the challenges of neurological and neuropsychological testing with the goals of presenting a guide to be able to confidently separate anxiety, depression, PTSD, progressive dementia, and true neuropsychological abnormality from common normal variant testing results. 


     

    400: Annual Membership Meeting

    This session will feature the induction of new ACOEM officers and directors, including ACOEM’s new president.


     

    406: Exposure, Metabolomics and Biomarkers, and Health Outcomes: Part I
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM  
     

    Dean P. Jones, PhD, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
    Timothy M. Mallon*, MD, MS, MPH, FACOEM, US Navy/Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD
    Karan Uppal, PhD, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
    Douglas Ian Walker, BS, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

    This session will discuss the examination of deployment exposures and describe various metabolomic and environmental biomarkers related to burn pit exposures. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.

     
     

    407: Diagnostic and Interventional Treatments for Upper Extremity Injuries Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound for OEM Physicians
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Bharat C. Patel, MD, DABIPP, DABPMR, FIPP, Deuk Spine Institute, Melbourne, FL
    Kristine Swinton Robinson, MD, FACEP, Department of Emergency Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV
    Yusef Sayeed*, MD, MPH, Meng, CPH, CMRO, Deuk Spine Institute, Melbourne, FL
    Michael P. Schaefer, MD, R-MSK, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
    Keziah Sully, MD, Deuk Spine Institute, Melbourne, FL

    This session is specifically designed for health care providers who are exploring musculoskeletal ultrasound to enhance the evaluation and management of the patients with upper limb injury and complaints. Covering the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints in detail, this course will present a systematic and focused assessment with ultrasound. The session will include both live scanning and when and how to intervene. The participant will develop ultrasound pattern recognition of the major tendons, ligaments, nerves, and muscles surrounding these joints. The case discussions will focus on pathologies that are commonly encountered. In addition, the session will cover regenerative medicine topics including platelet rich plasma, stem cell therapy, and the current state of the evidence.

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    408: Review and Update of 15 Years of the World Trade Center Health Program
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice  
     

    Faculty:

    Michael Crane*, MD, MPH, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
    Laura Crowley, MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
    Jacqueline Moline*, MD, MSc, FACOEM, Northwell Health, Great Neck, NY
    Julia Nicolaou, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
    Faith Ozbay, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

    This session will cover aspects of the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP) as it is pertinent to the practicing occupational medicine physician. The WTCHP is funded by NIOSH and dedicated to monitoring and surveillance of those responders and volunteers who were exposed to dust and debris at the World Trade Center disaster site. The WTCHP identifies and provides medical care for a range of physical and mental health conditions directly related to this exposure. These diseases include, but are not limited to: rhinitis, sinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease, traumatic injury, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The WTCHP provides medical monitoring and treatment services for WTC-related conditions, benefits counseling, and collects information to identify new potentially WTC-related conditions.


     

    409: Providing a Warm Hand-off: Connecting Safety-net Primary Care Providers with Occupational Health Consultation
    TRACK: OEM Education and Scientific Research  
     

    Faculty:

    Cristina Demian*, MD, MPH, University of Rochester Finger Lakes Occupational Health Services, Rochester, NY
    Tillman Farley, MD, Salud Family Health Center, Fort Lupton, CO
    Katherine H. Kirkland*, DrPH, MPH, Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics, Washington, DC
    Scott Morris*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Valley Medical Center of the University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    Nicholas K. Reul*, MD, MPH, Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, Olympia, WA
    Rosemary Sokas*, MD, MOH, FACOEM, Georgetown University, Washington, DC

    Low-wage, high-risk working populations often employed at small or marginal enterprises and frequently lack access to occupational health services. However, these workers may have access to safety net primary care through a network of federally qualified health centers and their look-alikes. Primary care clinicians in these settings often feel unprepared to address occupational health, are burdened addressing many other health needs, and are often unaware of existing occupational medicine expertise for referral or curbside consult. Potential resources include occupational health clinic networks in two states, Washington and New York, and occupational health and migrant clinicians network organizations, each of which has implemented programs to facilitate occupational health services. This session will review the needs and resources, examine what works and what doesn’t work, and explore approaches that the Underserved Occupational Populations Special Interest Section or ACOEM might pursue to develop and evaluate solutions. This session was organized by the Underserved Occupational Populations Special Interest Section.   


     

    411: Medical Marijuana
    TRACK: OEM Clinical Practice 

    Faculty:

    Kenneth R. Hosack, MA, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO
    Maria Michas*, MD, MPH, FACOEM, University of Massachusetts Health Care, Worcester, MA
    Paul Tauriello, Colorado Division of Workers' Compensation, Denver, CO

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the US and the drug most frequently detected in workplace drug-testing programs. Multiple states have enacted marijuana laws that conflict with federal laws. This session will address the workplace effects of medical and recreational marijuana, including practical responses to challenges and issues related to impairment.

     
     

    410: Exposure, Metabolomics and Biomarkers, and Health Outcomes, Part II
    TRACK: Regulatory, Legal, Military, and Governmental OEM

    Faculty:

    Phillip K. Hopke, PhD, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY
    Timothy M. Mallon*, MD, MS, MPH, FACOEM, US Navy/Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD
    Professor Julie Thakar, PhD, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Mark J. Utell*, MD, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY
    Collynn Woeller, PhD, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

    This session will help participants understand the tools used to identify molecular signatures associated with deployment exposures and to identify biological processes and disease pathways that are impacted. The session will discuss epigenitics, microRNAs, and inflammatory biomarkers, and changes to pre- and post-deployment, and the relationship with health outcomes in deployed service memebrs. Advances in large database statistical applications will be examined. This session was organized by the Federal and Military Occupational and Environmental Medicine Special Interest Section.